Wednesday, 09 August 2017 11:39

Canton: Drilling Mud Cause for Water Discoloration

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The City of Canton Water Department has issued a public service announcement regarding water quality in Perry Township. 

A large amount of drilling mud that's been dumped into the Beach Street Quarry near the Sugarcreek wellfield, courtesy of the Rover Pipeline. Increased pumped of the Sugarcreek wellfied, the area's primary source of drinking water, has caused a discoloration in that water. 

"That change in pumpage coming from our three different water treatment plants that pump into a common distribution system have stirred up that water in that particular area," Canton Water Department Superintendent Tyler Converse tells 1590 WAKR. He adds, "There was some concern brought up by Ohio EPA that there may be low-level contamination of diesel fuel within that drilling mud." Further testing has deemed the drinking water in Perry Township and the surrounding area safe to drink, and they're hoping that the discoloration issue will be resolved by the end of the month. 

The following is the statement from the City of Canton Water Department: 

 

CANTON, Ohio – This is a public service announcement from the City of Canton Water Department. As has been reported in the newspapers, a significant quantity of drilling mud was dumped into the Beach Street Quarry, which is located near the City’s Sugarcreek wellfield. This wellfield is one of the main sources of Canton’s drinking water. Rover Pipeline, Ohio EPA, and the City are taking a number of measures to protect our drinking water. Among the precautionary steps Canton is taking is reducing the amount of water we pump from the Sugarcreek wellfield and increasing the amount of water we draw from the Northwest wellfield, measures we intend to continue until the drilling mud has been removed.

 

The increased pumping at the Northwest wellfield has had the unintended consequence of discoloring the water in an area west of Canton, specifically along Tuscarawas Street West between Whipple Avenue on the east and Perry Drive on the west, and several blocks north and south. The discolored water is due to an increase in the amount of iron sediment. The iron is not coming from the drilling mud and is not a health concern, although it can change the taste and odor of the water and cause staining.

 

To minimize the undesirable consequences, the City is working on different pumping combinations and has begun hydrant flushing. We are hopeful that the drilling mud will be removed from the quarry in a matter of weeks, at which time we plan to resume normal pumping from the Sugarcreek wellfield. This should resolve the taste, odor, and staining issues currently being experienced by our customers.

 

Although this situation is temporary, we do understand that it is inconvenient to our residents and want to express our appreciation for your patience.

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