Adam Boylen of North Lawrence Township has been charged with four counts of violating the Clean Water Act after dumping wastewater in Tuscarawas River tributaries.

The U.S. Attorney for Northern District of Ohio, Carole Rendon, said in a statement, "(Boylen) willingly dumped wastewater into streams, fouling the water and killing aquatic life."

At the time, Boylen was employed by an Ohio-based trucking company and was tasked with disposing of wastewater properly. He didn't and was caught. Now the case is headed to federal court. 

Below is the full release. 

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A grand jury returned a four-count indictment charging a North Lawrence man with violating the Clean Water Act by dumping wastewater into tributaries of the Tuscarawas River, said Carole S. Rendon, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio.

Adam D. Boylen, 45, was indicted on four counts of violating the Clean Water Act by making unpermitted discharges.

“This defendant willingly dumped wastewater into streams, fouling the water and killing aquatic life,” Rendon said. “He put his convenience ahead of the public’s welfare. We remain committed to protecting our environment, and this defendant will now be held accountable for his actions.”

“Protecting our water is critical, both for the health and safety of our citizens and our wildlife,” Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine said. “We will continue to assist in this case and others like it to protect Ohio.”

“Our environmental laws help keep illegal waste out of local waterways and protect clean water and public health,” said John Gauthier, Acting Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. EPA’s criminal enforcement program in Ohio. “The illegal discharge in this case killed a substantial number of fish and caused serious damage to critical wildlife habitat. Today’s indictment is the direct result of the strong working relationship that EPA has built with our law enforcement partners at the federal, state, and local levels.”

Boylen was a driver employed by an Ohio-based trucking company. Boylen’s job was to load wastewater generated from corporate facilities into a tanker truck and to drive the wastewater to a designated facility located in Pennsylvania for proper disposal. The wastewater contained surfactants capable of killing vegetation and fish, according to court documents.

Instead of delivering the wastewater to Pennsylvania, Boylen drove the tanker truck to remote locations in Tuscarawas County and central-eastern Ohio and emptied the wastewater containing surfactants into waters of the United States, according to court documents.

Boylen is charged with dumping the wastewater into two different tributaries of the Tuscarawas River, a wetland adjacent to the Tuscarawas River, and the Beach City Reservoir, on numerous occasions between April 18 and May 4, 2016.

White foam flowed down tributaries and streams as a result of Boylen’s actions. In one instance, the foam traveled four miles downstream from the location where the tanker truck was emptied. Vegetation was killed at all the locations. Approximately 709 fish were killed in one of the tributaries, and collectively, approximately 3,231 minnows, crayfish, frogs, and tadpoles were killed, according to court documents.

If convicted, the sentence in this case will be determined by the court after consideration of the federal sentencing guidelines which depend upon a number of factors unique to each case, including the defendant’s prior criminal record, if any, the defendant’s role in the offenses and the unique characteristics of the violations. In all cases the sentence will not exceed the statutory maximum, and in most cases it will be less than the maximum.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Benedict S. Gullo and Brad J. Beeson. The case was investigated by the United States and Ohio Environmental Protection Agencies, the Ohio Attorney General’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation, the Stark County Sheriff’s Offices, the Tuscarawas County Sheriff’s Offices, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, and the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.

An indictment is only a charge and is not evidence of guilt. A defendant is entitled to a fair trial in which it will be the government’s burden to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

Published in Local
Wednesday, 13 July 2016 16:00

VIDEO Former Fugitive Bartoli Pleads Guilty

A one-time Uniontown financial guru, who went on the lam after prosecutors discovered a Ponzi scheme that snared millions from a $65 million dollars fund from investors, has plead guilty to eight counts of fraud, conspiracy and attempted income tax evasion.

Eric Bartoli was first indicted in 2003 but fled his Doylestown, Ohio Cyprus Funds offices after he blew off a hearing and a warrant was issued for his arrest. He remained at large for a decade, but was finally discovered in Peru and extradited back to the United States. His fraud impacted 800 investors spread across Latin America and the United States in a scheme to sell certificates of deposit and mutual funds.

The case attracted worldwide attention and was even featured on the popular CNBC program "American Greed." Bartoli will be sentenced November 9th in U.S. District Court.

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(U.S. Attorney) Eric V. Bartoli, who was indicted in 2003 and was a fugitive for more than a decade, pleaded guilty to defrauding hundreds of investors out of millions of dollars in the 1990s, law enforcement officials said.

Bartoli is scheduled to be sentenced Nov. 9 after pleading guilty to eight counts, including conspiracy, securities fraud, sale of unregistered securities, wire fraud, mail fraud and attempted income tax evasion.

The guilty plea was announced by Carole S. Rendon, Acting U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio, Stephen D. Anthony, Special Agent in Charge of the Cleveland Division of the FBI, and Kathy A. Enstrom, Special Agent in Charge, IRS Criminal Investigation, Cincinnati Field Office.

Bartoli operated a large-scale Ponzi scheme from 1995 through 1999. He created and operated a company by the name of Cyprus Funds, Inc., which was based in Doylestown, Ohio and incorporated in Central America. Bartoli and his co-conspirators operated Cyprus to sell certificates of deposit and unregistered mutual funds. Cyprus raised approximately $65 million from an estimated 800 investors in Latin America and the United States. Some of Cyprus's victims included retirees, according to court records.

Bartoli was sued in 1999 by the Securities and Exchange Commission on charges involving the Cyprus Funds, Inc. Bartoli did not appear at a scheduled hearing regarding the SEC charges. He was subsequently found in contempt of court and a civil arrest warrant was issued. Bartoli had fled Ohio and was arrested in New Hampshire. Bartoli was not detained at that time and became a fugitive.

An indictment was filed against Bartoli in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio in October 2003.

Bartoli was taken into custody by the Peruvian National Police in Lima, Peru, in 2013. The operation was a joint effort between the FBI, Diplomatic Security Service, and the Peruvian National Police. He was returned to the United States last year.

"Mr. Bartoli is finally being held accountable for his crimes, more than two decades after he started stealing millions of dollars," Rendon said. "The fact that he will finally be sentenced for his actions is a tribute to all who have worked on this case, who never stopped pursuing justice for the victims."

"After years of living on the run, Mr. Bartoli is accepting responsibility for swindling individuals out of large sums of money - some their entire life savings," Anthony said. "The FBI will continue to investigate fraudsters, like Eric Bartoli, and will hold them accountable for their criminal behavior, no matter how long it takes."

"The investigation of Mr. Bartoli uncovered a multi-million dollar Ponzi scheme laced with a web of financial lies that left 800 investors in financial peril," Entstrom said. "When you knowingly mix deceit and trickery into the financial well-being of individuals, you create a recipe for devastation that could last a lifetime. Combining the financial investigative expertise of the IRS with the skills and resources of the FBI and the U.S. Attorney's Office makes a formidable team for combating major, greed-driven crimes."

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Antoinette T. Bacon and Christos M. Georgalis following an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Internal Revenue Service and the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Published in Local
Wednesday, 01 June 2016 17:46

Feds Indict Akron Fentanyl Dealer

A 27-year old Akron man is the latest casualty of the war on heroin and fentanyl, but a casualty still alive andindicted by a federal grand jury on charges he supplied the fatal does of fentanyl that killed a drug user identified as "J.H." by the U.S. Attorney for Northern Ohio last September. Jurmaine Jeffries faces two counts in the indictment with an extra sentencing penalty because the drug overdose led to a death, said Acting U.S. Attorney Carole Rendon.

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(U.S. Attorney) An Akron man was indicted on federal charges for distributing fentanyl that caused the death of a person in last fall, said Carole Rendon, Acting U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio.

Jurmaine A. Jeffries, 27, was named in the two-count indictment. He is charged with distribution of fentanyl and possession with intent to distribute fentanyl. The indictment also seeks a sentencing enhancement because the fentanyl Jeffries sold resulted in the death on Sept. 16, 2015, of a person identified as J.H. in Akron, according to the indictment.

"We will continue to work to educate the public on the dangers of opioids and get help for those who want it," Rendon said. "We will also aggressively prosecute those who sell heroin and fentanyl, which have caused so much pain and death in our community."

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Linda K. Barr following an investigation by the Drug Enforcement Administration.

If convicted, the defendant's sentence will be determined by the court after review of factors unique to this case, including the defendant's prior criminal records, if any, the Defendant's role in the offenses and the unique characteristics of the violations. In all cases, the sentence will not exceed the statutory maximum and in most cases it will be less than the maximum.

An indictment is only a charge and is not evidence of guilt. A defendant is entitled to a fair trial in which it will be the government's burden to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

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