The Soap Box Derby is not just an All-American thing anymore.

Mark Gerberich, the president of the Soap Box Derby, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the future expansion of the derby. Gerberich says he is looking for the derby to continue growing their STEM programs, not just in America, but internationally, as well. As far as Australia goes, Sphere Leadership will take on the reigns of building the derby Down Under, which won’t take place until either 2019 or 2020.

The big picture for the derby, according to Gerberich, is to help expand to countries in Asia and Europe.

The downfall of Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein continues to spiral as more actors and those around the industry have claimed some form of harassment. Not only have many already come forward, but others have mentioned they have known about Weinstein’s transgressions for years and even decades.

Sexual harassment has been a sticking point not just in Hollywood circles, but also our workplaces. Attorney and former mayor of Peninsula, Mike Kaplan, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the protocol and the reporting process of harassment in work environments.

Kaplan touched on possible grey areas in sexual harassment suits, as well as the blatant ones. In criminal cases, where it goes beyond workplace protocol, Kaplan mentions the difference between sexual conduct and sexual contact.

Thursday, 05 October 2017 09:20

AUDIO: Ed Asner on Autism Advocacy, Awareness

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He’s a familiar name from television, movies, and voice-acting. That familiar name will be appearing at the Akron Civic Theater on October 12.

Part of the Autism Society of Greater Akron’s Autism Summit, Ed Asner and his son, Matt, will be a part of a panel with Bruce Winges. He recently spoke with WAKR’s Tony Mazur about his advocacy for autism awareness, especially in a time when the affliction was not as well known. Asner also discussed the portrayal of autism in the media, and how far it has come in recent years.

The 3rd Annual Autism Summit will continue on October 13th, as well, at the Hilton Akron-Fairlawn. For more information on the festivities, visit AutismAkron.org/conference.

After sitting vacant for nearly a decade, and after numerous attempts at bringing some life to the venue, the Rubber Bowl will soon become rubble.

Mayor Dan Horrigan joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the present and future of the Rubber Bowl and the surrounding area. Safety and security are big issues, mainly with “trill seekers” breaking in to take photos of the decay. Once the structure meets the wrecking ball, Horrigan says this helps change the landscape of the area, and he looks forward to how the surrounding area will look afterward.

The Rubber Bowl opened its doors in 1940, hosting the Akron Zips football team for its entire run. Over the years, the venue was used as a neutral site for football teams and site for music festivals.

Monday, 25 September 2017 06:34

1590 WAKR Student Athlete of the Week: Victoria Young

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This week's 1590 WAKR Female student athlete of the week is Victoria Young from Kenmore-Garfield High School.

A sophomore soccer player for the Golden Rams, Victoria just started playing soccer after a friend told her to give it a try. She is a defender on the team.

Young says the transition from Garfield has been a bit overwhelming, but she is adjusting to being in a combined high school of over 1200 students.

In her future, Victoria would maybe like to be a lawyer and have her practice somewhere in Northeast Ohio.

Best of luck, Victoria!

Monday, 25 September 2017 06:34

1590 WAKR Student Athlete of the Week: Victoria Young

Written by
This week's 1590 WAKR Female student athlete of the week is Victoria Young from Kenmore-Garfield High School.

A sophomore soccer player for the Golden Rams, Victoria just started playing soccer after a friend told her to give it a try. She is a defender on the team.

Young says the transition from Garfield has been a bit overwhelming, but she is adjusting to being in a combined high school of over 1200 students.

In her future, Victoria would maybe like to be a lawyer and have her practice somewhere in Northeast Ohio.

Best of luck, Victoria!

Romona Robinson is not originally from Northeast Ohio, but you wouldn’t know that based on her commitment to the community. Whether she is on a local newscast or speaking at a church, she has made a pledge to spread the positive news of the world.

Romona joined the Ray Horner Morning Show, hosted by Tony Mazur, to promote her new book, A Dirt Road to Somewhere. A decade-long labor of love has come to fruition in the form of print, and it is an inspiring story of being raised in a small, poverty-stricken town to having the chance to interview presidents. Romona also talks about her embrace of Northeast Ohio over her 30-year career in Cleveland television.

Romona’s day job is as the evening anchor for Cleveland 19 News, after spending a 15-year run at WKYC Channel 3. A Dirt Road to Somewhere from Halo Publishing is available on Amazon, as well as her website, RomonaRobinson.com.

Make that 21 wins in a row for the Cleveland Indians, an American League record for consecutive victories. This is a feat that has not happened in nearly a century, and it takes a team effort.

Tom Hamilton, the voice of the Tribe, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about what he has seen from the broadcast booth. Hamilton believes the Indians turned their season around in the month of August, when they had to face a number of above.-500 teams, which he says was a separator. He points to the two starts against Chris Sale where the offense “manhandled” the Cy Young hopeful.

Going forward, the Indians’ voice talked about what to expect when Jason Kipnis and Andrew Miller are healthy, as well as if fans will see Michael Brantley again this season.

Tuesday, 12 September 2017 09:22

AUDIO: City Council Divided On Future Of Columbus Day

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A few weeks ago, Ward 4 councilman Russ Neal created a proposal for the city of Akron to distance themselves from Columbus Day. This news came around the time when Oberlin dropped Columbus Day in favor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, though not everyone in Akron was as gun-ho about a potential change.

In fact, in the city council chambers, the topic and corresponding votes were divided among racial lines, with all of the black council members voting ‘yes’ to drop Columbus Day.

Though he understands Neal’s concerns, Ward 2 councilman Bruce Kilby voted ‘no’ on the measure. Kilby spoke on the Ray Horner Morning Show of the “contentious” atmosphere in the chambers, and how the measure appeared to be more divisive than helpful and progressive. Kilby says he does not mind instilling an Indigenous Peoples’ Day, but is not in favor of ditching Columbus Day, either.

Kilby also said he was glad they voted on the measure when they did so they can “put [the issue] to bed.” He feels racial lines in the Akron area have been “pretty good” when compared to other major cities, especially in recent memory.

Councilman Neal also joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to recap the meeting and vote. Neal believes the decision to retain Columbus Day in Akron is “disheartening,” but claims the discussion will continue.

On Sunday afternoon, news of Chief James Nice’s resignation from the Akron Police Department broke, which prompted immediate speculation. Mayor Dan Horrigan called a 12:30 press conference on Monday to clear up any confusion.

On Tuesday, Mayor Horrigan and Kenneth Ball, the new chief of police, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss Nice’s resignation and how the city will move forward. Horrigan is a firm believer in accountability and transparency in his cabinet, and he demands the same in other departments as far as maintaining that trust in the community. Ball reiterated those comments.

Many surmised the resignation was due to the suicide of the teenager inside the police cruiser, but both the mayor and chief stressed this was an unrelated incident.

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