After over thirty years and 369 wins under his belt, John Gramuglia has decided to pass the torch.

The head coach of the Wadsworth wrestling team joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to look back on his decorated career with the Grizzlies. Gramuglia felt this was the right time to step aside and give the program some new blood. He feels the program must continue to evolve, and knows it is in good hands.

Gramuglia will not be going far. Though he won’t be head coach anymore, he plans on guiding the team in a less hands-on role, and will help further develop the youth program.

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A very unpredictable spring has led to a brutal allergy season for many. Patients are desperate for relief, and many want to know the balance between under and overmedication. Two specialists from Cleveland Clinic/Akron General joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in the thick of allergy season. First, Dr. Tim Brown discussed the priciness of treatments and how and where to find them. Dr. Bela Faltay, an allergy specialist, talked about inexpensive over-the-counter remedies and allergy shots.

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The snowblowers have been put away, and the snow brushes have been sent to the trunks. The focus in May shifts from the chilly weather to sunburn.

Dr. Jim Libecco from Allied Dermatology in Fairlawn joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss proper skincare as the weather warms up. Dr. Libecco stresses the use of sunscreen when being exposed to any sun for an extended period. Application for sunscreen should be a half hour before exposure, and should be used every two to three hours. Peak hours for sun are between 10 AM and 4 PM.

Per Dr. Libecco, a checkup with a dermatologist or primary care physician is suggested once a year.

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Wednesday, 02 May 2018 08:48

AUDIO: Kenmore To Get a Facelift

While downtown Akron is getting renovated, other neighborhoods are seeing facelifts of their own. One of those areas seeing the revitalization is Kenmore.

John Buntin, the owner Kenmore Komics and president of the Kenmore Chamber of Commerce, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the present and future of the boulevard, from the businesses to the street itself. The city of Akron is investing in the area, and Buntin feels this partnership with the city will be highly beneficial down the road. In fact, Buntin and others are attempting to get a historical listing for the district to take advantage of federal tax dollars.

Buntin says the first priority on the list to improve Kenmore is to repave the street, which will occur sometime in June.

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The first week of May is Law Week with the Akron Bar Association. On Monday to kick off the week, the Ray Horner Morning Show welcomed a slew of attorneys to speak about their expertise. Dean Carro - Akron Bar Association

Farhad Sethna - Immigration

Linda Ulinski - Estate & Will Planning

Debora Ruby - Marital Law

Nancy Holland - Workplace Harassment

Elizabeth Knowles - Immigration & Human Rights Law

Jeff Laybourne - Defense Attorney

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The uncertainty on the future of the Akron Racers has been a topic of speculation for months. However, a recent settlement has provided a sliver of clarity for 2019.

Joey Arrietta joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to update the listeners on the goings on these last few months. Like the Cleveland Browns in 1996, the goal for Joey was to retain the Racers name, colors, and tradition, and that has been the case for the Racers, as well. The new incarnation of the Racers will not have any connection to the Cleveland Comets.

Looking back on what has been built since 1999, Joey is proud of the potential for a new team in 2019. She looks forward to speaking with local businesses and investors, especially with the lure of historic Firestone Stadium and the Racers foundation.

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It was announced some weeks back at Matthew Wilson, then-president at the University of Akron, was stepping down from his position, and the search continues to fill those big shoes.

In the meantime, Dr. John Green, director of the Bliss Institute and professor of political science, has been named as the interim president at the University of Akron. Dr. Green joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about his appointment to his new position and how he plans on keeping business going as a new president search goes on. One of the strong points of Dr. Green being the president has been his tenure at the college, which has been more than thirty years.

Dr. Green also praised the job Matthew Wilson did after the fallout of Scott Scarborough two years prior.

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On Monday, Akron City Council announced the age for the sale of tobacco products have been raised from 18 to 21. Originally proposed by Tamiyka Rose, Akron becomes the tenth city in the state of Ohio to become a “Tobacco 21” town.

Akron mayor Dan Horrigan joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to share his thoughts. Though he understands any pushback the city could receive, the mayor feels this is a larger part of the evolution of the culture, and by curbing the use of tobacco, it will help promote a healthier society. Jeff Fusco is a part of city council, and he felt that the lack of availability of the products, based on research, would lessen the amount of teen smoking rates.

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Tuesday, 17 April 2018 07:52

AUDIO: Experts Speak on Syria Strike

On Friday, President Trump announced the United States carried out a strike on Syria, coming off the heels of a chemical attack that occurred on its own citizens earlier in the week. So what is next? Was this a one-time message-sending strike, or could this lead to a full-scale war?

The Ray Horner Morning Show welcomed three international experts to speak on this subject.

Dr. John Green

Jeff McCausland

Dr. Steven Hook

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This week has shown some uncertain futures for two long-time staples in the Akron area.

Dan Horrigan, the mayor of Akron, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss a few local topics, one of them being the sale of the Akron Beacon Journal to GateHouse Media. Horrigan believes in a strong local newspaper to hold the politicians accountable, and has said the Beacon is part of the fabric of the city. Once the sale goes through, the mayor wants to sit with the new owners to discuss their approach to journalism and the business community.

Horrigan also touched on the Bridgestone Invitational, which will leave town after 2018. The mayor is disappointed that the Bridgestone will not return for 2019, especially with how it affects the local economy and the Northeast Ohio Golf Charities. He says the city will work on bringing a new tournament to town, with the hopes of the top golfers in the world coming back, as well.

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For the fourth-straight year since LeBron James has returned from South Beach, the Cleveland Cavaliers are embarking on another playoff run.

John Michael, the radio voice of the Cavs, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to preview the playoffs and the team’s opponent. Michael says the rotations and matchups will depend on their opponent, and regardless, Tyronn Lue will typically rotate nine players in the game. The final game of the season will mark the first time in LeBron’s career he will have played in all 82 contests, and Michael made a case for him being the MVP.

The Cavs’ voice also talked about other potential foes in the Eastern Conference, including young and hungry teams such as the Milwaukee Bucks and Philadelphia 76ers.

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A staple in the world of is making his jump from classic rock radio to reality television. And he is taking his family with him.

Eddie Money called into the Ray Horner Morning Show, guest-hosted by Tony Mazur, to promote his new reality show, Real Money, which debuts April 8th on AXS-TV. Real Money follows the Money family around, which includes his wife, Laurie, five kids, and eight animals. Click this link to view a two-minute trailer for the new show.

In addition to the new show, Money also talked about his love of the Dodgers, whom he has followed since his days of living in Brooklyn. The 69-year-old singer also chatted about the comeback of vinyl records, his adoration for performing in Northeast Ohio, and a look back at his hit songs, which are still in heavy rotation on rock radio.

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After a shockingly brief appearance in the postseason, the 2018 Cleveland Indians are fired up and ready for the regular season to begin.

Bob DiBiasio, VP with the Indians, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to preview the opening day roster. One of the questions on the team has been Michael Brantley, and though he will start the year on the disabled list, Bobby D says the veteran outfielder has not experienced any setbacks. Other topics of discussion are the continued strength of the pitching staff and retaining Mike Napoli in the organization.

The Indians take on the Seattle Mariners Thursday night for the regular season opener. Progressive Field opens up eight days later on April 6th, when the Tribe takes on the Kansas City Royals.

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It is only Wednesday, but there have already been a number of tragic stories. However, both have been contained as of Wednesday morning.

Tim Dimoff, the president and CEO of SACS Security Consulting, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the events that occurred in Austin, Texas and Great Mills, Maryland. In the Austin case, Dimoff talks about how the suspect’s cell phone and other devices left somewhat of a paper trail that led the authorities to him. As for the Maryland school shooting, Dimoff talks about how the resource officer neutralized the threat and took down the shooter, leaving the shooter as the lone fatality.

As of this morning, just before this interview was aired, the Austin suspect was identified as 24-year-old Mark Anthony Conditt.

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Children in the future will know what it was like to be a Toys ‘R’ Us kid. But it is not just the toy stores that are being affected.

Jonathan Walsh, consumer reporter at WEWS/News 5 in Cleveland, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the change in shopping habits. Walsh believes today's consumer is very concerned with convenience shopping, which does not bode well for the traditional brick-and-mortar stores such as Toys ‘R’ Us, Claire’s, and Sam’s Club, which are either closing some or all of their facilities in the near future. He says those stores failed to embrace the online shopping boom, and their downfalls are evident.

Shopping habits are changing across the board, not just in retail. Walsh mentions the trend in “curbside” grocery shopping, where employees of the store pick out items on a list made ahead of time. Even stores like Target and Walmart have introduced groceries into their facilities for the consumer’s convenience.

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The trees of Issue 4 are beginning to bear fruit. One of those fruits is a new fire station in Middlebury.

Akron mayor Dan Horrigan joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about replacing fire station #2 over on East Market Street. Horrigan has stressed the monies from Issue 4 will be split into thirds, and fire is one of those categories. The other two are police and streets, and more than 54 miles of road will be resurfaced this year.

The mayor also talked about the Hamburger Festival hiatus. Due to the construction downtown, Horrigan believes the Hamburger Festival would have had a difficult time operating, though other events at Lock 3 should not be affected.

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The All-American Soap Box Derby continues to spread its name and purpose across the globe. A few months back it was Australia. Now China is getting into the mix.

Mark Gerberich, the president and CEO of the AASBD, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the derby heading east. Gerberich believes it is a great opportunity for the derby to head to Australia, China, and beyond, from both a brand-building and education standpoint. In China, the goal is for students to experience a taste of American culture, and, down the road, they hope Chinese students will come through Akron for summer camps.

The 81st FirstEnergy All-American Soap Box Derby will be from July 15th-21st at Derby Downs, next door to the Rubber Bowl and Akron-Fulton Airport.

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Over the last decade, the push to revitalize some of Akron’s non-downtown neighborhoods is beginning to pay dividends. One such neighborhood is Highland Square, which appears to be the model for other areas.

Planning director Jason Segedy joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the success of Highland Square. Segedy believes the mix of housing and retail has been the key for Highland Square, along with the Bohemian, artistic vibe the area gives off. It is one of the few areas where the old houses remain in solid condition, and is a model of stable property value.

Other neighborhoods have been undergoing facelifts, and some could look very different over the course of a decade. West Hill, which is down the street from Highland Square, could see a revitalization soon, as could Kenmore, North Hill, and what was once the Innerbelt.

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The city of Stow has two large retail districts, but the downtown area does not have much development. That may soon change.

At-large councilman Mike Rasor joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to showcase his ideas for a downtown Stow. Rasor says he put out a poll on social media, and response for downtown development was overwhelmingly positive. The idea is for an entertainment and retail district to be set up on the northwest corner of the Darrow Road and Graham Road intersection.

Rasor says this will be a few years away, but the city is talking to developers right now.

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In the last two decades, there has been a rash of school shootings, and a common theme with them is that they seem to occur in suburban areas. These suburbs get shaken for a long time, in that many would never believe something like a school shooting would happen in their community.

Norton, Ohio shares some characteristics with towns such as Columbine, Chardon, and Parkland, so what is that community doing to prevent gun violence? Dana Addis, the superintendent of Norton schools, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss what his district is doing to help the safety of their students. Addis says they are conducting meetings with students and doing everything they can to ensure their safety. He even says students are communication to get a better understanding of each other.

One of the factors holding up the process nationwide is the cost of added security. Addis brings up the stat that only four percent of schools use metal detectors due to the high costs.

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Thursday, 01 March 2018 07:28

Wahoo Week, Day 3

Wahoo Week is almost over, but that means we are getting closer to the official start of baseball season. Ray Horner is still out in Goodyear, Arizona, and he has grabbed interviews with members of the Indians, on-field personnel and off.

Bradley Zimmer - Outfielder Sandy Alomar Jr. - First Base Coach Mike Napoli - First Baseman/DH Eric Hasse - Minor League Catcher Edwin Encarnacion - DH/First Baseman Carl Willis - Pitching Coach Bob DiBiasio - VP, Public Relations Bobby Bradley - Minor League Outfielder

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Some two weeks after the settlement with Nexus, some residents of Green are none too please with their city’s response.

Green mayor Gerard Neugebauer joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to address his residents’ concerns. Ultimately, Neugebauer said the initial goal was to move the pipeline out of town, and because that could not happen, he is disappointed with the outcome. However, he says the city’s mission now is to work with Nexus to make the pipe safe for everyone.

Originally, the pipe was supposed to travel six-and-a-half miles through the city. The pushback on Nexus caused the pipe to be extended to eight miles, but through a more rural area to the south than what was initially planned. The mayor says if any residents see anything suspicious with the pipeline, they should call (330) 896-6930 to report what they have witnessed.

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In August 2017, then-Akron police chief James Nice was asked to resign from his post after accusations of racism and inappropriate workplace behavior became public. Now, Nice had his police certificate relinquished after pleading guilty over the unauthorized use of a police database.

Nice joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to read a prepared statement in response to what has been said and written about him over the last six months. In the statement, he believes these allegations against him are “simply not true,” and they have caused him “great economic and emotion harm" over the damage to his reputation.

Due to the litigation, Nice could not divulge much information at this time, but he says he will continue to "seek justice."

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Tuesday, 13 February 2018 07:45

AUDIO: David James on Student, Teacher Safety

Ahead of David James's State of the Schools address on Tuesday at the Tangier, the focus has been on teacher safety and discipline. Several teachers claim the schools are not doing enough as far as disciplinary actions, and they lined up in protest in front of the Akron Board of Education on Monday night.

David James, the superintendent of Akron Public Schools, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in studio sort out the outcries and give both the teachers union and the board a platform. James is concerned about the safety of the teachers, but also believes these assaults may be a case-by-case situations, as opposed to a widespread problem. He mentioned what is considered assault, which is a wide and varying scope, and that students have the opportunity for due process.

The APS superintendent mentioned the creation of alternative programs for certain students, including those who have special needs such as autism.

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Wednesday, 07 February 2018 09:26

AUDIO: Mayor Judge on Barberton Road Repairs

The city of Barberton continues to tweak and improve their city, and a major part of that is fixing the streets. Through federal grants, Barberton has received over $8 million for road improvements.

Bill Judge, the mayor of Barberton, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the grant. Judge believes this is “huge news” and “desperately needed” to fix the streets. The streets getting the facelift to start are Norton Avenue, and Wooster Road North and West. Judge is hoping for additional funding down the road for infrastructure.

As for the current roads and conditions during the winter, Judge says the salt supply is still doing well, and they have when they need for city services.

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A sad day for softball fans in the area, as the Akron Racers may be no more, at least in 2018. Joey Arrietta, who ran the Racers from top to bottom, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to sort through the news, which caught her by surprise a few weeks back. Arrietta was ousted as general manager, and now the future of softball remains in doubt. Firestone Stadium will still house high school and collegiate games throughout the summer. An emotional Arrietta says she is fighting to retain the team’s name and the colors, though that is up to the league to decide. As far as the league goes, speculation as to how long it will remain continues to loom.

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2018 is nearly a month old, and the mayor of Akron, Dan Horrigan, addressed some of the needs and visions in the community on the Ray Horner Morning Show. Topics discussed: *The Akron Racers not playing in 2018, and how that will affect Firestone Stadium and the area of South Akron *What is left of the Rubber Bowl, which looks to cost about $400,000 to demolish *The area surrounding the Rubber Bowl, including Akron-Fulton Airport. *Continued development of the 31 acres that once made up the Innerbelt *Issue 4 and the upgrades to the city’s roads and firehouses *The sewer project

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The kid out of Peoria, Illinois is headed to Cooperstown, by way of Philadelphia, Chicago, Los Angeles, Baltimore, and, most notably, Cleveland. Jim Thome, the Indians’ all-time home run leader, is the newest member of the Baseball Hall of Fame, picked on his first try.

Bob DiBiasio, VP of the Tribe, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the heart of Thome’s Indians career, which began in 1991, ended in 2002, and had a brief homecoming in 2011. DiBiasio talked about what Thome did off the field, which was where he showcased both his work ethic and his humble personality.

Sheldon Ocker, who covered the Tribe for decades, also came on WAKR to remember Thome. Ocker had the chance to see the lanky infielder grow to become one of his generation’s greatest power hitters. Ocker also shared his thoughts on Omar Vizquel, who had a nice showing in his first time on the ballot.

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Friday, 12 January 2018 07:40

AUDIO: Lenny Wilkens on Dr. King, LeBron

It has been a half-century since Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee. Dr. King’s message has resonated with the people for generations, and that continues to this day.

On January 14th, the day before what would have been Dr. King’s 89th birthday, the Akron-Summit County Public Library will host a lecture, which features hall of fame player and coach Lenny Wilkens. “Coach Lenny” joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to not only talk about King, but how Jackie Robinson really affected him while growing up in Brooklyn, New York, in the shadows of Ebbets Field.

Wilkens also talked about LeBron James, coaching the 1992 Dream Team, and what coaches influenced him throughout his career. Wilkens’s speech will be at 2 PM on Sunday, and it is free to the public.

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It was announced Monday from the mayor’s office than Dan Horrigan will be eliminating three positions in his cabinet. Those positions are in communications, health and education, and community relations.

Horrigan, the mayor of Akron, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss why he made this decision. With the revenue falling short, Horrigan says he wanted accountability to start with his office. The layoffs, according to the mayor, are “purely for economics,” as this will free up close to $430,000.

Speaking of economics, Horrigan also touched on the dollar allocation from Issue 4. He explains Issue 4 is an 11-month collection, and that will not begin until February.

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Thursday, 04 January 2018 08:38

AUDIO: David James on APS School Closings

2018 has begun, but not for a lot of schools. With the extremely low temperatures, schools across Northeast Ohio have canceled classes for students, thus extending their winter breaks. But how will these dates be made up?

David James, superintendent of Akron Public Schools, talked to the Ray Horner Morning Show about schools’ protocol in calling off classes. In the past, the local districts had five allotted days to play with, but now high school students must have 1,001 hours to complete.

James says if Akron Public Schools has to miss more than the given calamity days due to weather or power outages, students will have to make up the time either after the school year or during spring break.

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A staple on morning radio and in nighttime comedy clubs, Jackie “The Joke Man" has a new book available for those who enjoyed his work in both scenes.

Jackie Martling joined 1590 WAKR to promote his new book, The Joke Man: Bow to Stern. For over fifteen years, Martling was a writer and performer on the popular Howard Stern Show, and in the book he writes about his experiences. He talked to Tony Mazur about being a part of the show, balancing out morning radio and doing comedy, and even told some classic jokes.

The Joke Man: Bow to Stern is available on Amazon and on his website, JackieTheJokeman.com. He also maintains a Twitter account and has a joke phone line, which has been in existence since 1979.

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Thursday, 30 November 2017 07:22

AUDIO: Dr. John Green On DeWine/Husted Ticket

The 2018 gubernatorial race in the state of Ohio is beginning to shed some extra weight. Secretary of State Jon Husted, who threw his hat in the race, has decided to join forces with Mike DeWine in the attorney general’s quest for governor.

Dr. John Green, director of the Bliss Institute at the University of Akron, discussed the ticket of DeWine and Husted. Green believes this “would be a very attractive pair of candidates” in the race, which also features fellow Republicans in Mary Taylor and Jim Renacci. Green went back a quarter-century when a similar instance happened with DeWine joining George Voinovich’s path to Columbus, which was a success.

Green also talked about the other Republicans and their chances at the office. He believes Renacci, an ardent backer of President Trump, needs to get his name out there in larger border cities like Cleveland, Toledo, and Cincinnati.

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Monday, 30 October 2017 07:44

AUDIO: Jim France On Setting Wins Record

The Manchester Panthers are heading to the playoffs at full speed, and they did so with a 58-42 victory over Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy. But a major footnote from that contest was it was the 382nd victory for head coach Jim France, and that made him the all-time winningest coach in Ohio high school football history.

France, who is also Manchester’s principal, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to recap the win over CVCA, as well as the relief of achieving the record. It is a family affair at Manchester, with France’s son as the offensive coordinator and his grandson is the starting quarterback.

The Panthers finished the season 8-2, and will take on Fairless this Friday in the Division V playoffs.

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It may not be in prime time and it may not be against Michigan, but the Ohio State Buckeyes have their work cut out for them against Penn State.

Former Buckeye Matt Finkes joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to preview the matchup between these Big Ten rivals. Finkes, who played some big games with the team in the 1990s, gave his perspective on the importance of rest coming off a bye week. Penn State has been the class of the Big Ten the last year, and Finkes broke down what the Buckeyes’ game plan should be.

Finkes also touched on Ohio State’s improvements since their early loss to Oklahoma, including the adjustments made by quarterback JT Barrett.

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The Soap Box Derby is not just an All-American thing anymore.

Mark Gerberich, the president of the Soap Box Derby, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the future expansion of the derby. Gerberich says he is looking for the derby to continue growing their STEM programs, not just in America, but internationally, as well. As far as Australia goes, Sphere Leadership will take on the reigns of building the derby Down Under, which won’t take place until either 2019 or 2020.

The big picture for the derby, according to Gerberich, is to help expand to countries in Asia and Europe.

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Thursday, 05 October 2017 09:20

AUDIO: Ed Asner on Autism Advocacy, Awareness

He’s a familiar name from television, movies, and voice-acting. That familiar name will be appearing at the Akron Civic Theater on October 12.

Part of the Autism Society of Greater Akron’s Autism Summit, Ed Asner and his son, Matt, will be a part of a panel with Bruce Winges. He recently spoke with WAKR’s Tony Mazur about his advocacy for autism awareness, especially in a time when the affliction was not as well known. Asner also discussed the portrayal of autism in the media, and how far it has come in recent years.

The 3rd Annual Autism Summit will continue on October 13th, as well, at the Hilton Akron-Fairlawn. For more information on the festivities, visit AutismAkron.org/conference.

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Payton Grigsby from Wadsworth High School is our female 1590 WAKR Student Athlete for the week of September 22nd-29th.

A senior at Wadsworth, Payton has participated in cross-country since her sophomore year. She was a quick learner and a natural athlete, as she has placed high many meets, including taking home first place in an individual race at the Wooster Invitational in early September.

“We do about forty miles a week,” says Payton when talking about her cross-country training. “We definitely build a good base, and do a bunch of speed work toward the end of the season.”

However, cross-country running was not Payton’s first love. She has played soccer from an early age, and decided to run track her freshman year. Her experiences in track and field led her to joining the cross-country team as a sophomore.

After high school, Payton is still undecided as to where she wants to continue her education. She does plan on running in college, talking with schools from Divisions 1 through III. In the classroom, Payton would like to major in Art Therapy.

“I’ve always wanted to help people,” she says about art therapy. "I love art, and I think that’s the best thing for me right now."

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JoJo France is this week's 1590 WAKR Male Student Athlete. He is a senior at Manchester High School, participating in football and basketball for the Panthers.

Jojo is proud to be able to carry on the the tradition of the France name at Manchester.

"It means a lot to me," says Jojo, who is proud to carry on the tradition of the France name at Manchester. "And I know it means a lot to them."

In fact, his head coach, Jim France, is his grandfather.

Two-time ​Pac 7 first-team basketball player, as well as Pac 7 first-team football, are just some of the accomplishments Jojo has earned in his time at Manchester.

As for his post high school education, Jojo has an interest in sports management, with an eye on scouting or sports management. He currently excels in government class.

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After sitting vacant for nearly a decade, and after numerous attempts at bringing some life to the venue, the Rubber Bowl will soon become rubble.

Mayor Dan Horrigan joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the present and future of the Rubber Bowl and the surrounding area. Safety and security are big issues, mainly with “trill seekers” breaking in to take photos of the decay. Once the structure meets the wrecking ball, Horrigan says this helps change the landscape of the area, and he looks forward to how the surrounding area will look afterward.

The Rubber Bowl opened its doors in 1940, hosting the Akron Zips football team for its entire run. Over the years, the venue was used as a neutral site for football teams and site for music festivals.

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Romona Robinson is not originally from Northeast Ohio, but you wouldn’t know that based on her commitment to the community. Whether she is on a local newscast or speaking at a church, she has made a pledge to spread the positive news of the world.

Romona joined the Ray Horner Morning Show, hosted by Tony Mazur, to promote her new book, A Dirt Road to Somewhere. A decade-long labor of love has come to fruition in the form of print, and it is an inspiring story of being raised in a small, poverty-stricken town to having the chance to interview presidents. Romona also talks about her embrace of Northeast Ohio over her 30-year career in Cleveland television.

Romona’s day job is as the evening anchor for Cleveland 19 News, after spending a 15-year run at WKYC Channel 3. A Dirt Road to Somewhere from Halo Publishing is available on Amazon, as well as her website, RomonaRobinson.com.

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A few weeks ago, Ward 4 councilman Russ Neal created a proposal for the city of Akron to distance themselves from Columbus Day. This news came around the time when Oberlin dropped Columbus Day in favor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, though not everyone in Akron was as gun-ho about a potential change.

In fact, in the city council chambers, the topic and corresponding votes were divided among racial lines, with all of the black council members voting ‘yes’ to drop Columbus Day.

Though he understands Neal’s concerns, Ward 2 councilman Bruce Kilby voted ‘no’ on the measure. Kilby spoke on the Ray Horner Morning Show of the “contentious” atmosphere in the chambers, and how the measure appeared to be more divisive than helpful and progressive. Kilby says he does not mind instilling an Indigenous Peoples’ Day, but is not in favor of ditching Columbus Day, either.

Kilby also said he was glad they voted on the measure when they did so they can “put [the issue] to bed.” He feels racial lines in the Akron area have been “pretty good” when compared to other major cities, especially in recent memory.

Councilman Neal also joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to recap the meeting and vote. Neal believes the decision to retain Columbus Day in Akron is “disheartening,” but claims the discussion will continue.

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On Sunday afternoon, news of Chief James Nice’s resignation from the Akron Police Department broke, which prompted immediate speculation. Mayor Dan Horrigan called a 12:30 press conference on Monday to clear up any confusion.

On Tuesday, Mayor Horrigan and Kenneth Ball, the new chief of police, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss Nice’s resignation and how the city will move forward. Horrigan is a firm believer in accountability and transparency in his cabinet, and he demands the same in other departments as far as maintaining that trust in the community. Ball reiterated those comments.

Many surmised the resignation was due to the suicide of the teenager inside the police cruiser, but both the mayor and chief stressed this was an unrelated incident.

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A new school year has begun at the University of Akron, and the atmosphere and the vibes are quite positive.

Matthew Wilson, the president of the university, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss all that is happening around the campus for 2017-2018. Wilson has met with the new freshman class, and says the student housing is currently at its peak. The new class, according to Wilson, is from all over the state, not just confined to the immediate area.

Wilson also mentioned some cosmetic changes around the campus. One of those facelifts is a $21 million renovation of the School of Law.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER
A talking point that Congressman Jim Renacci has discussed often is how Americans are tired of career politicians making decisions, both locally and nationally. That was evidenced last November when Donald Trump, a businessman-turned-politician, was elected president.

Congressman Jim Renacci joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in studio to talk about his own campaign for governor. Renacci, a long-time businessman much like Trump, has thrown his hat in the race for governor in 2018.

In addition to the goings on in Ohio, Rep. Renacci also discussed the incidents in Charlottesville, the Affordable Care Act, and national security when dealing with North Korea.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER
A talking point that Congressman Jim Renacci has discussed often is how Americans are tired of career politicians making decisions, both locally and nationally. That was evidenced last November when Donald Trump, a businessman-turned-politician, was elected president.

Congressman Jim Renacci joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in studio to talk about his own campaign for governor. Renacci, a long-time businessman much like Trump, has thrown his hat in the race for governor in 2018.

In addition to the goings on in Ohio, Rep. Renacci also discussed the incidents in Charlottesville, the Affordable Care Act, and national security when dealing with North Korea.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER

A talking point that Congressman Jim Renacci has discussed often is how Americans are tired of career politicians making decisions, both locally and nationally. That was evidenced last November when Donald Trump, a businessman-turned-politician, was elected president. Congressman Jim Renacci joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in studio to talk about his own campaign for governor. Renacci, a long-time businessman much like Trump, has thrown his hat in the race for governor in 2018. In addition to the goings on in Ohio, Rep. Renacci also discussed the incidents in Charlottesville, the Affordable Care Act, and national security when dealing with North Korea.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER
The Fighting Irish lost a coach who helped Notre Dame return to prominence. That coach happened to have roots in Akron.

John Feinstein, author, commentator, and talk show host, was in the Akron area and joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in studio. Feinstein talked about the passing of Fighting Irish coach Ara Parseghian, who helped lead Notre Dame to two titles, and the impact he had on the program and college football in general.

Feinstein is in town for the Bridgestone Invitational, and he and Ray talked about the field and how the tournament is fairing without Tiger Woods.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER
At the end of 2016, Richard Lennon announced he would step down as bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cleveland due to health problems. This left a space inside the diocese, temporarily filled by Most Reverend Daniel Thomas of the Diocese of Toledo.

On Tuesday, it was announced that Bishop Nelson Perez will take over that position permanently, and he called into the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss his journey. Bishop Perez talked about his upbringing, his embrace of Northeast Ohio, and how much different being a bishop is in 2017 as opposed to what it was years and decades prior.

The Diocese of Cleveland covers eight counties, including Cuyahoga, Summit, Lake, Geauga, Lorain, Medina, Wayne, and Ashland.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER
Two days after the shootings in Alexandria, Virginia on GOP members practicing baseball, Washington D.C. is still shaken from the impact. The charity baseball game was always a way for both parties to come together, but this time even more so.

Congressman Jim Renacci joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about his op-ed in the Columbus Dispatch, which calls for the parties to begin working together. In his six-and-a-half years in congress, Renacci believes the political rhetoric is out of control, saying the bipartisan measures rarely get reported. He stresses the importance of the parties working together on bigger issues such as solving the debt.

The Ohio congressman was at a bipartisan breakfast when the shootings occurred, and he discussed his relationship with House Whip Steve Scalise and his fellow Republicans on the baseball field.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER
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