At the end of 2016, Richard Lennon announced he would step down as bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cleveland due to health problems. This left a space inside the diocese, temporarily filled by Most Reverend Daniel Thomas of the Diocese of Toledo.

On Tuesday, it was announced that Bishop Nelson Perez will take over that position permanently, and he called into the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss his journey. Bishop Perez talked about his upbringing, his embrace of Northeast Ohio, and how much different being a bishop is in 2017 as opposed to what it was years and decades prior.

The Diocese of Cleveland covers eight counties, including Cuyahoga, Summit, Lake, Geauga, Lorain, Medina, Wayne, and Ashland.

Voters across the country have long clamored for transparency among their politicians. At least in Akron city council, that method is being applied.

Ward 5 councilwoman Tara Mosley-Samples has been an advocate for streaming council meetings, and this vision is about to become a reality. She joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in studio to talk about the purpose for showing the goings on during these meetings.

Mosley-Samples shared her thoughts on the tax hike first proposed by Mayor Dan Horrigan, as well as the residential property tax abatement.

Thursday, 29 June 2017 09:03

AUDIO: Sen. Brown On Healthcare Divide

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The revised healthcare bill continues to be split down party lines, though some in the GOP are not exactly falling in line with their counterparts, either.

Senator Sherrod Brown joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to break down the mood in Washington, at least on his side of the spectrum. Senator Brown believes the revised healthcare bill, spearheaded by Mitch McConnell, is nothing more than “a tax cut bill” that will only help those the rich. Brown says cutting Medicaid will hurt those in states like Ohio getting treatments for opioids.

In addition to healthcare, Senator Brown discussed cyber threats and President Trump’s travel ban, which he does not believe was executed properly and could be considered illegal.

The 2016-2017 school year has been over for a few weeks in the Akron Public Schools, and now they look ahead to the fall. However, they will do so with six schools consolidated to three, which means some will be without jobs.

David James, the superintendent of Akron Public Schools, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss these changes. The closures of Kenmore High School, Kent Middle School, and Bettes Elementary will result in over 70 job cuts, all due to consolidation. However, these administrators may not be completely out of jobs due to what is called “priority transfer.” According to James, there is a fluid process where the affected teachers or other administrators, based on seniority, can fill other positions where those in place had either resigned or retired.

As for the Kenmore-Garfield merger, the students at the now-former Garfield High School will move into the Kenmore building in the fall. Then as the old Garfield building gets demolished, plans for the new school construction will be underway.

It was announced on Monday that Summa Health System will be eliminating 300 positions due to a $60 million operating loss in 2017. The largest employer in Summit County, Summa Health has 8,000 workers across the area.

Interim President and CEO of Summa Health System, Dr. Cliff Deveny, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to address these job losses. Dr. Deveny cites dramatic drops in outpatient volume are due to trust issues, as well as competition from other area health providers, as reasons for the cuts. Most of the positions being cut are at the administrative level, so it will not affect patient care.

Dr. Deveny is confident Summa Health can weather the storm, but in order to do so, the company must continue to grow by being "freestanding and independent.”

It was announced Thursday the city of Akron has plans for an income tax increase from 2.25 to 2.5 percent. If approved by City Council, the tax proposal will go on the ballots in November.

Mayor Dan Horrigan spoke in-depth on this proposal on the Ray Horner Morning Show. Horrigan says the quarter-percent tax increase will raise $15 million for the city, and the money will go into the police and fire departments and the streets.

The proposal will be presented to council on Monday, and once approved, Horrigan and other council members will hold town halls to discuss exactly where the residents’ tax dollars are going.

Tuesday, 20 June 2017 09:45

AUDIO: John Michael On Cavs GM Search

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Exactly one year after the Cleveland Cavaliers hoisted up the Larry O’Brien trophy, the Cleveland Cavaliers are on the lookout for a new general manager. David Griffin, the now-former GM of the Cavs, has parted ways with the organization, eleven days before his contract was to expire.

What is next? Who is next? Why did this happen? John Michael, the radio voice of the Cavs, answered some of those questions on the Ray Horner Morning Show. Michael admitted the timing of this parting of ways was a bit puzzling, since the NBA Draft and free agency are right around the corner. As far as a replacement, Michael believes a new GM could be named “sooner rather than later.”

Back to Griffin, Michael felt the former Cavs executive was a “player’s GM” who stressed team chemistry. Griffin helped transform the team in just three short years through the acquisitions of JR Smith, Iman Shumpert, Timofey Mozgov, and others. Michael also thought Griffin did a good job based on the little flexibility the team had.

Two days after the shootings in Alexandria, Virginia on GOP members practicing baseball, Washington D.C. is still shaken from the impact. The charity baseball game was always a way for both parties to come together, but this time even more so.

Congressman Jim Renacci joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about his op-ed in the Columbus Dispatch, which calls for the parties to begin working together. In his six-and-a-half years in congress, Renacci believes the political rhetoric is out of control, saying the bipartisan measures rarely get reported. He stresses the importance of the parties working together on bigger issues such as solving the debt.

The Ohio congressman was at a bipartisan breakfast when the shootings occurred, and he discussed his relationship with House Whip Steve Scalise and his fellow Republicans on the baseball field.

Thursday, 15 June 2017 08:57

AUDIO: Sen. Brown On Alexandria Shootings

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On Wednesday, GOP members of Congress were shot at on a baseball field in Alexandria, Virginia, which caused a few injuries, including wounds to House Whip Steve Scalise. The Republicans were practicing for a charity baseball game at Nationals Park, with the Democrats warming up at a field a few miles away.

It was decided the game will go on. Current US senator and former member of the Democrat baseball team, Sherrod Brown, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the shooting. Brown wants something to be done about the violence in the country, and hopes President Trump can be “more of a healer and not a divider” in times like these.

As far as the charity baseball game goes, Brown says the game must go on, believing a cancellation of it would “look cowardly."

Remember the days of shopping for clothes at Sears? What about the Blue Light Specials at Kmart? Those days are rapidly becoming a distant memory, thanks to the way retail has changed in the age of the internet.

Jonathan Walsh, consumer reporter at WEWS/News 5 in Cleveland, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the near and distant future of retail stores. Walsh says traditional malls and brick-and-morter stores have fallen by the wayside as far as what the customer wants. Young buyers are looking to spend their money on attractions than straight retail.

Because the consumer wants to spend their dollars on entertainment in addition to retail, Walsh believes destination shopping centers such as Crocker Park and Legacy Village are still doing fine.

https://soundcloud.com/wakr-newstalksports/jonathan-walsh-on-wakr-6132017
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