What a time to take over as the athletic director of a major Division I university. Your first week in charge and now NCAA student-athletes are eligible to recieve possible compensation.

Charles Guthrie is the new AD at the University of Akron, and he joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about this news, which he believed was inevitable based on the direction of the NCAA and public opinions were concerned. He also looked at the Zips' athletic program overall, especially heading into a school year coming out of a pandemic.


Wednesday, 07 July 2021 04:33

APD: Suspects Stole Truck, Used Victim's Credit Card

Written by

Akron Police are looking for help identifying two men accused of stealing a truck from VanDevere Chevrolet on Vernon Odom Boulevard and then using the victim's credit card that was left inside the truck. 

The photos below are from the Bell Stores Marathon at 1805 East Market Street on June 21st. 

Anyone with information is asked to call Akron Police. 

Tuesday, 06 July 2021 10:35

Hey Bobby! - 7/7/2021

Written by
Time now for Hey Bobby!, a weekly Cleveland Indians segment with VP Bob DiBiasio and WAKR's Ray Horner.

Today, Bobby and Ray talked about the best places in the ballpark to take in a game, the recent losing streak and rash of injuries with the Tribe, and the impact of Shohei Otani in the American League.

Hey Bobby! is powered by NECA-IBEW.

In the last year, police departments across the country experienced a wave of criticism and condemnation for many of their practices, and that has caused a big fallout. Many departments have seen their forces decimated by retirements and outright quitting, and countless departments are having troubles getting anyone to join.

Clay Cozart is the president of the Akron FOP, and he joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to share those sentiments. Cozart says Akron is having a tough time recruiting anyone to join their force, especially minority hires, which seem to be a constant thread in other cities and townships across America.


Wind and Solar power development in Ohio is now facing tighter regulation, as Ohio's Republican-controlled legislature this week approved adding an additional layer of government oversight to the site approval process, entirely along party lines. All of the Akron area's Democratic State Representatives, as well as Democratic Senator, Vernon Sykes, voted against it.

Now, County officials will have the opportunity to decide whether or not property owners, many of whom are farmers, will be allowed to install wind and solar production facilities on their land, before their application even gets the the state agency that was created specifically to do that type of work; the Ohio Power Siting Board. As a result; County Commissioners could ban wind or solar projects outright, or limit them to "energy development districts".

That extra layer of regulation, Senate Bill 52, faced a great deal of opposition from groups that are not normally politically aligned, including labor unions, enviornmental groups, farmers, and the business community.

Listen now to hear part of a recent Ohio House Public Utilities Committee hearing on the issue, as well as our interview with Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Vice President for Advocacy and Strategic Initiatives, Brian Dicken, who explains why they opposed the bill, which is now on its way to Ohio Governor, Mike DeWine, for final approval.


BRIAN DICKEN TOLEDO CHAMBER

Brian Dicken, Toledo Chamber of Commerce Vice President for Advocacy and Strategic Initiatives

The Akron Fire Investigative Bureau is looking for help identifying a person of interest in multiple house fires in the Kenmore area.
 
The Akron Fire Fighters Association Local 330 released photos of the suspect Thursday: 
 
 

Thursday, 01 July 2021 07:44

WAKR Security Seminar

Written by
In these politically and socially-charged times, there has been a major increase in violence and violent rhetoric in the United States. What will help calm the waters?

WAKR's Ray Horner hosted a roundtable via Zoom with three experts who specialize in the field of security, from boots-on-the-ground law enforcement to cyber threats. Some topics Ray brought up dealt with the general rise in crime and how to handle it, the January 6th fallout and domestic terrorism, QAnon

Paul Viollis heads up Viollis Group International, and he has a background in global security and law enforcement.

Dr. Karl Kaltenthaler is the director of the Center for Intelligence and Security Studies at the University of Akron.

Tim Dimoff is the president and CEO of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, and prior to starting his own security LLC, he spent two decades in law enforcement.

As cities slowly come out from the pandemic, thus lifting many, if not all the restrictions, places such as Akron have a lot to work with.

Dan Horrigan is the mayor of Akron, and he joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to look at the subject of infrastructure, from the focus on downtown development to housing in the city limits. He also touched on projects like the sewers and the dollars that go towards them, as well as the future of the site that has housed Chapel Hill Mall for all these decades.


Wednesday, 30 June 2021 09:24

Soap Box Derby "Back on Track" in 2021

Written by

AKRON, Ohio (June 29, 2021) – Soap Box Derby racing has been halted only twice in its history dating back to 1934: for four years beginning in 1942 during World War II and last year due to a pandemic. Now, as COVID-19 cases dramatically decline following vaccinations and states across the country have rolled back restrictions, communities nationwide are staging local races to qualify participants for the 83rd FirstEnergy All-American Soap Box Derby here on Saturday, July 24.

Derby Downs Track

Using the theme “Back on Track,” Soap Box Derby officials are busily making preparations to welcome more than 300 local racers to Akron’s Derby Down for pre-race activities beginning Tuesday, July 20.

“We are extremely excited to return to racing at Derby Downs as COVID restrictions have been lifted in Ohio and other states,” said Mark Gerberich, president and chief executive officer. “Our priority always has been the health and safety of our racers and their families, volunteers and staff members. With that in mind, our Race Week schedule will focus on providing participants with opportunities to race on the famous Derby Downs track, while limiting events at other venues.”

Boys and girls between the ages of 7 and 20 have earned the right to compete in the championship finals here by winning local Soap Box Derby races in their hometowns or by accumulating points in a series of rally competitions held around the United States and Canada since last fall.

On Tuesday, July 20, participants will check in at Derby Downs and make trial runs down the 989-foot Derby Downs track. Contestants will compete in Challenge races on Wednesday and Thursday, July 21 and 22.

On Saturday, July 24, a track parade and opening ceremonies kick off at 8 a.m. and the first heat of the 83rd FirstEnergy All-American Soap Box Derby will be held at 8:30 a.m. Championship heats will start at approximately 3 p.m., followed by an awards ceremony at the track. Racers will be competing for a share of $36,000 in college scholarships.

Race day tickets are available in advance for $5 at www.tickets.soapboxderby.org.

Wednesday, 30 June 2021 07:38

Dr. Thomas File on Delta Variant Concerns

Written by
Rapidly, the Delta variant has become the dominant form of COVID-19 in many parts of the globe, including India, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Is this variant deadlier or is it just more contagious? And will the vaccines prevent the spread?

Dr. Thomas File is an infectious disease expert at Summa Health, and he answered those questions and more on the Ray Horner Morning Show. Many of the concerns Dr. File and other health experts have are in parts of the country that are not as vaccinated, such as Mississippi, where only 30% of the state has received their shots. He does say that the vaccines are putting up a great fight against the Delta variant, most notably the two-shot MRNA vaccines in Pfizer and Moderna.


Page 9 of 142