Wednesday, 05 September 2018 11:47

Akron's Primary Move in the Hands of the Voters

Akron voters will decide in November whether or not the city's primary election will be held in September, as it has been, or move to May, as the Mayor's Office is proposing.

City Council held a special meeting Tuesday, approving the ballot measure, after the Board of Elections verified more than 6,100 signatures that Mayor Dan Horrigan's Office collected. The Mayor's efforts exceeded the requirement per the Board of Election, as he actually collected nearly 9,200, and only needed a little more than 4,200 valid, Akron resident's signatures.

See the full press release from the City of Akron below: 

Akron, Ohio, September 5, 2018  A ballot measure to move the local primary election from September to May—to better comply with state law regarding overseas and military ballots, increase voter turnout and save taxpayer money—will come before Akron voters this November. More than 6,100 Akron voters signed petitions submitted to Council, requesting the opportunity to vote on the issue. The grassroots petition effort spearheaded by Mayor Horrigan, Council President Sommerville and Vice President Fusco well exceeded the number of signatures required to place the issue on the ballot. Council approved the petition-initiated measure at a special meeting held yesterday evening. 

The May primary proposal was first announced in early July as a joint effort by several Summit County communities that currently hold primaries in September. September primaries, which predate early voting laws, now conflict with state law intended to ensure overseas voters, including active duty military, can participate fully in local elections. This change would provide ample time for the Board of Elections to certify results before the general election. For Akron, a May primary would save taxpayers more than $80,000 each election and could increase voter turnout by about 46%. Cities in 85 out of 88 Ohio counties and the State of Ohio already hold primaries in May.

A majority of Akron City Council supported the ballot measure. However, five Council members (Sims, Omobien, Neal, Kilby, and Milkovich) opposed placing the issue before Akron voters. Therefore, the petition process was initiated and successfully completed to enable Akron voters to decide when their local primary should be held. Pleased with an efficient and effective petition drive, Mayor Horrigan added, “This is democracy at work. City and Council leadership felt strongly that this is exactly the type of issue that should be put before voters. Our petition signers agreed, and helped us put this common-sense measure where it belongs, which is on the ballot.”

More information about the May primary proposal is available here. The ballot measure will be assigned an issue number by the Board of Elections next week. It will be presented to Akron voters on the upcoming November ballot as provided below:

Shall Section 4 of the Charter of the City of Akron be amended to move the primary election date for municipal elections to the first Tuesday after the first Monday in May consistent with the primary election date established by state law?

YES

NO

 

Published in Local

(City of Akron) Today, Mayor Dan Horrigan joined the members of the new Akron Fulton Airport Advisory Board to announce the City of Akron’s recommitment to the future of the airport as an economic development driver for the city and region. The Akron Fulton Airport Advisory Board was formed earlier this year to make recommendations to City leadership and provide insight into how to best channel resources to catalyze business development.


“I established the Advisory Board because I have witnessed, first-hand, that in most thriving cities the regional general aviation airport plays a critical role in fostering and supporting economic development activities,” Mayor Horrigan said. “In light of market trends, we all must be more intentional and aligned in our pursuit of growth—and investing in the Akron Fulton Airport is a key part of our strategy to set Akron apart and attract new job-creating businesses.”

The Advisory Board has been busy developing a strategic plan for the airport’s future use and development to achieve the Mayor Horrigan’s vision. Included in this plan are efforts to enhance service to customers and rebrand and market the airport. The City’s Office of Integrated Development stands poised to assist and support the attraction of new airport customers and development in and around the airport.

The City is making important capital investments in the airport as well, including flight obstruction clearing, which is nearly complete. These improvements will allow for flight operations at night and during low visibility conditions. The resurfacing of main runway 7-25 will take place in 2020, followed by the removal of the north-south runway 1-19. Both projects are funded 90% by the Federal Aviation Administration, 5% by the Ohio Department of Transportation, and 5% by local City funds. These improvements, along with the demolition of the Rubber Bowl, will open up new opportunities for development that can complement flight operations.

“I’m really excited about the possibilities and opportunities at Akron Fulton,” Phil Maynard, chair of the Akron Fulton Airport Advisory Board said. “The sky’s the limit!”

“I appreciate the ground work the Board has done thus far, and I urge them to continue to solicit input from diverse enterprises to determine how we best strengthen the airport together,” Mayor Horrigan continued. “I am encouraged by the immense potential for growth, and I have full confidence in Phil Maynard and the other leaders who have agreed to serve on the Advisory Board. I look forward to collaborating with them and our business community to drive a new, successful chapter in the history of the Akron Fulton Airport.”

Published in Local
Tuesday, 31 July 2018 11:50

Mayor: Voters to Decide on Primary Date

Akron City Council was one vote shy of passing a measure that would have moved the City's primary election from September to May. 

But Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan says the fight isn't over. 

Mayor Horrigan's office has been a vocal proponent of moving the Primaries, and for a number of reasons, as the Mayor tells the 1590 WAKR Newsroom. Those reasons being that the city would save roughly $84,000 per year, that voter turnout would be higher, and that the city, by aligning the primary with the statewide primary, would be in compliance with a state law regarding the timing of when absentee ballots are sent to overseas voters and military voters. 

Opponents within City Council claim that the primary move is of a political nature and favors incumbents, adding that minority candidates are hurt by a shorter primary season as they're unable to raise enough money to give themselves a fighting chance in the eleciton. 

To his opponents, Mayor Horrigan says, "I'll do a serious debate with anybody across the City to be able to convince people to be able to do this, and if there's a real opposition to this, let the voter's decide... and we'll live with the results just like everybody else." 

The Mayor is committed to getting the necessary 4,200 signatures from Akron residents to get the measure on the November ballot, saying it should be up to the voters to decide. 

Published in News
Thursday, 26 July 2018 06:25

CC Akron General Unveils New ED

A little more than two-and-a-half years in the making, the brand new Cleveland Akron General Emergency Department was unveiled to local leaders and the media on Wednesday. During the ribbon cutting ceremony, Akron General President Dr. Brian Harte reinforced the hospital system's commitment to the Akron area. 

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Ribbon cutting photo (left to right):
Summit County Executive Ilene Shapiro
Edmund Sabanegh, M.D., president of Cleveland Clinic main campus and regional hospitals
Tom Mihaljevic, M.D., CEO and president of Cleveland Clinic 
Brian Harte, M.D., president of Akron General
Brad Borden, M.D., chairman of Cleveland Clinic’s Emergency Services Institute
Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan
 

Read more from the Cleveland Clinic below: 

Cleveland Clinic Akron General’s new $49.3 million emergency department opens to patients at 7 a.m. on Tuesday, July 31, more than tripling the size of its current emergency department and enhancing patient experience.

“This new emergency department is a very visible example of Cleveland Clinic Akron General’s commitment to meeting the healthcare needs of the residents of Akron and the surrounding communities,” said Brian Harte, M.D., president of Akron General. “As a regional Level I Trauma Center, we serve patients with critical injuries and this investment will help our caregivers provide safe, high-quality care in the most efficient manner possible.”

The new emergency department is designed to expedite the process from admittance through discharge and includes:

  • Sixty total treatment rooms, including:
    • Two trauma rooms that double the size of trauma care capacity
    • Two resuscitation rooms
    • Six rooms for minor injuries and illnesses
    • Five behavioral health rooms
  • A rooftop helipad
  • An imaging department, including a CT scanner and two radiographic rooms
  • A designated area for Akron General’s PATH Center (Providing Access to Healing) through which Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners provide quality, trauma-informed, compassionate care to victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, elder abuse and neglect
  • A designated area for quarantining and treating highly contagious patients

The emergency department is located on the first floor of a new 67,000-square-foot building and a new second-floor bridge connects it to the surgery center at the main hospital in downtown Akron. Administrative offices are located on the second floor along with a 19-bed observation unit that will be used for treatment and evaluation while determining whether a patient needs to be admitted to the hospital.

The building follows environmentally friendly design practices, continuing Cleveland Clinic’s energy conservation and sustainability efforts, including:

•Water efficiency: Low-flow toilets and sinks use about 40 percent less water than a baseline system.

•Energy efficiency: 100 percent LED lighting and building automation system optimizes the usage of conditioned air.

•Energy conservation: Indoor lights utilize daylight when available.

•Landfill diversion: Reduced waste, improved quality and increased safety due to more construction materials being fabricated offsite. 90 percent of construction debris was reclaimed and repurposed for other usable products.

•Indoor air quality: Use of low-VOC paints, adhesives, furnishing and materials to reduce indoor air pollution.

A reception was held for community and health system leaders this morning, and a special open house will be held for caregivers this afternoon. A community open house will be held on Saturday, July 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The building was designed by Hasenstab Architects and constructed by The Ruhlin Company.

Published in Local

Former Akron Police Chief James Nice is suing the City of Akron, Mayor Dan Horrigan, and current Police Chief Ken Ball for defamation of character according to the suit that was filed in U.S. District Court in Akron Tuesday.

In addition the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor's Office is looking to get Nice's guilty plea that was filed in February, tossed out. In the lawsuit, Nice said that he only pleaded guilty attempted unlawful use of property to avoid prosecution for more serious meritless offenses.

The City of Akron released a statement, pointing out that Jim Nice voluntarily resigned his position last August after "serious allegations" of conduct unbecoming an officer. The statement went on to say that "at no point did the City misrepresent any information or mislead the public" regarding those allegations.

Read the full text from the lawsuit and the full response from the City of Akron below: 

James Nice Complaint Filed

City of Akron Response: 

James Nice voluntarily resigned from the City of Akron on August 27, 2017, following serious allegations that he engaged in conduct unbecoming of a member of the Akron Police Department.  When asked to respond to the allegations against him, James Nice chose to resign rather than face disciplinary action. James Nice later pled guilty to a misdemeanor offense related to his criminal misuse of a police database and surrendered his Ohio Peace Officer Training Certification. Throughout this period, the various allegations against James Nice caused the City of Akron and the men and women of the Akron Police Department significant unwanted disruption and embarrassment.  At no point did the City misrepresent any information or mislead the public in any way regarding the former Chief’s apparent misconduct.

In 2018, the City of Akron and the Akron Police Department have moved on from that unfortunate chapter and are rightly focused on doing the critically important work of the Department – making Akron’s neighborhoods safer, protecting Akron homes and businesses, and improving the lives of Akron residents through engaged community policing.  While it is unfortunate that any additional taxpayer resources will be spent responding to a frivolous lawsuit by the former Chief, the City and Akron Police Department will not be distracted from fulfilling the work the community expects and deserves - responding to the pressing needs and concerns of our citizens and pursuing meaningful solutions to those truly important issues facing our city.

 

Published in Local
Friday, 06 April 2018 09:27

Akron Fire, EMS Getting Ballistic Vests

The City of Akron has announced that starting the week of April 5th, all Akron Firefighters and EMS will wear ballistic vests and helmets on calls that are deemed more dangerous and threatening to their safety. 

Mayor Dan Horrigan was quoted in a press release, saying, “This is the unfortunate but necessary result of changes in our landscape, including the increasing frequency of volatile and dangerous emergency situations. One of our highest responsibilities is to the safety of our first responders.  Our firefighter/medics can’t help others unless they are safe and protected themselves.”

The protective exuipment was made possible, in part, thanks to the passage of Issue 4, the income tax increase, back in November. The press release noted that the Northern Ohio Golf Charities also provided a $29,000 to cover costs as well. According to the press release, each Akron EMS unit will be outfitted with four sets of ballistic gear (helmets and vests), "to be used whenever conditions warrant added protection." Those conditions, as explained by the city, would include active shooter situations, or other calls that have the potential for escalating into violent situations. 

“Ballistic protection for the safety of our personnel has been a priority for the Akron Fire Department for many years,” Fire Chief Clarence Tucker said. “Providing our officers with this gear will allow them to more safely respond and care for victims at the scene of a shooting or other violent event.”

 

Published in Local
Friday, 29 December 2017 09:36

Akron Extends Warming Center Hours

Akron is in store for more bitter cold temps as we make are way toward the New Year, with overnight lows in the single, even negative digits Saturday and Sunday. In response, the City of Akron has extended cold shelter hours at various community centers throughout the city.. Mayor Horrigan said, in a press release, "The City of Akron would like to do our part in making sure we provide a warm place to drop in and escape the cold." 

Meanwhile, Haven of Rest Ministries is under a "Code Zero", reminding Akron area residents who may be looking for a break from the cold, that their doors are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Haven is located at 175 E. Market Street in Downtown Akron. 

See the full press release and list of community centers below: 

(CITY OF AKRON) Akron, Ohio, December 28, 2017 –

Effective Saturday, December 30, 2017 and continuing through Monday, January 1, the City of Akron will be extending hours in three community centers to double as warming centers for those residents who are in need.

“As temperatures are slated to drop significantly, and some citizens may not have adequate access to a properly heated facility throughout the day, the City of Akron would like to do our part in making sure we provide a warm place to drop in and escape the cold,” Mayor Dan Horrigan said. “Specific centers will now be open on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day, when many other public spaces may be closed.”

The following centers will be open Saturday, Dec 30 – Monday, Jan 1, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.:

Mason Park Community Center 700 E. Exchange Street Akron, OH 44306 330-375-2821

Patterson Park Community Center 800 Patterson Avenue Akron, OH 44310 330-375-2819

Summit Lake Community Center 380 W. Crosier Street Akron, OH 44311 330-375-2826

The City will continue to monitor for continuous frigid temperatures. Unless otherwise specified, the centers will return to their normal business hours starting January 2, 2018. 

Published in Local

Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan says it's a criminal investigation that led to his surprise call Sunday to Chief of Police James Nice to resign -- and not the death of a teenager Friday in the backseat of a police cruiser of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Nice delivered a terse 30 word resignation letter around 4:00 yesterday afternoon. Mayor Horrigan told reporters this afternoon he had been informed by police higher-ups that the Chief was part of an investigation involving his nephew, Joseph Nice of Uniontown, who is under indictment relating to his auto sales business. The case involved possible criminal misconduct by Nice, city officials said, including making derogatory comments and inappropriate conduct with city employees.

The City says it will turn the information over to the Summit County Prosecutor, but wouldn't provide more information or a timeline.

 

Joseph Nice of Uniontown was indicted for grand theft and forgery in March of this year. His criminal case is being heard by Judge Jason Wells in Summit County Common Pleas Court. The nephew Nice is also listed in numerous civil lawsuits in Summit County, including lawsuits alleging fraud and breach of contract for the sale of automobiles through Metro ACC Car Sales on Waterloo Road. 

Below is the statement released from the Office of Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan regarding the resignation of former Chief James Nice: 

Akron, Ohio, August 28, 2017 – Mayor Horrigan formally asked for, and accepted, the resignation of City of Akron Police Chief James Nice effective Sunday, August 27th, 2017. Evidence of conduct unbecoming of an officer, inappropriate contact with a city employee and potential criminal misconduct led him to make this immediate decision. The City will be referring any and all information regarding potential criminal conduct to the County Prosecutor.

Mayor Horrigan stated, “These actions violate the mission, vision and values of the Akron Police Department and the City of Akron and they will not be tolerated. All of us who serve the public must hold ourselves to the highest standards of ethics and integrity. It is clear to me, that in this instance, Jim Nice’s conduct violated that standard, and he lost his ability to lead the department. I will not let anyone impugn the integrity and confidence of our City organization, and I will fiercely uphold that standard as long as I am Mayor of this City.”

Mayor added, “What is also clear to me, is that the men and women of the Akron Police Department acted appropriately and swiftly upon receiving information of misconduct. At every step of the way, investigators put what was right above all else. I have full faith and confidence in the department going forward.”

Mayor Horrigan appointed Major Kenneth Ball as acting Chief of the Akron Police Department, effective August 27th. Ball, an Akron resident, has more than 26 years of service to the Akron Police Department. He joined the Akron Police Department in 1991, was promoted to sergeant in 1997; lieutenant in 2000; captain in 2006; and major in March of 2015. He graduated from the Police Executive Leadership College in 2001, and from the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia in 2013.

Mayor Horrigan will work closely with Deputy Mayor of Public Safety Charles Brown and Director of Human Resources Don Rice to select a permanent police chief, in accordance with the Charter of the City of Akron.

 

 

Published in Local
Thursday, 10 August 2017 11:24

Own a Piece of Akron History

The smokestacks have been partially cut down at the B.F. Goodrich plant on South Main Street for safety reasons, but the remains of the stacks that were trimmed can now be purchased. 

The decision to shorten the northern stack came after the City of Akron was told the cost to preserve it would be around $1 Million, in addition to the growing concern for area residents safety as deterioration was causing loose bricks to fall. Demolition took place earlier this year, knocking off nearly 100 feet from the north stack. The bricks from that demolition were preserved and are now available to buy for $50 apiece, limited to three bricks per person. 

“While the partial removal of the northern stack was an unfortunate necessity, it creates a unique opportunity for individuals to own a piece of Akron’s rich industrial history,” Mayor Horrigan said in a press release Thursday. 

Thos interested in buying a brick, or three, can visit www.akronohio.gov and click on the "Buy Brick from the BF Goodrich Stack" icon on the site, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. directly. 

Published in Local
Thursday, 20 July 2017 09:56

Get Inside Akron City Hall

You can't fight City Hall -- but Mayor Horrigan would at least like to have one you can talk with. The Mayor unveiling what he's calling the Akron Citizens Institute to give up to 25 citizens regular opportunities to meet with department heads to learn more about how city government works -- and give department heads more direct feedback, too.

Applications are now being taken online at the City's website.

- - -

(City of Akron) The City of Akron is committed to directly empowering residents and educating the public about how their city government works for them. That's why Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan is proud to announce that applications are now being accepted for the inaugural class of the City of Akron Citizens Institute.

The Citizens Institute will provide Akron residents with an opportunity to gain an inside view of the operations of City government while engaging directly with City of Akron leaders. "If residents don't know or understand what is going on in the halls of their government, it can leave them feeling disconnected and disheartened," Mayor Horrigan said of the inspiration for this program. "It's our responsibility as government officials to engage residents by inviting them to the table, educating them about our rules and processes, and empowering them to give feedback."

Mayor Horrigan asked his staff to design a diverse City-government curriculum and turn City Hall into a "community classroom" where residents can learn and ask questions of City leaders, department directors, and front-line staff.

The City of Akron Citizens Institute will be a free, 10-week experience in which a group of approximately 25 Akron residents will meet once a week to engage with City departments and leaders and learn more about city programs and services. Residents will engage in discussions about the City's charter form of government, its responsibilities and duties, and its accountability to the public.

Applicants must be 18 years of age, or older, and must be current residents of Akron. The Institute will run from late August through early November, 2017.

Published in Local

In a memo sent to Summa Health employees Monday morning, interim President and CEO Dr. Cliff Deveny announced that the health system would be eliminating 300 positions and consolidating or otherwise eliminating some services going forward. 

The Akron Beacon Journal reported earlier Monday that Dr. Deveny cited a $60 Million operating loss for 2017 as the reason for the layoffs and cuts in services. In that memo, Dr. Deveny says Summa will continue to reevaluate the company's ongoing capital needs, and that all new projects must be evaluated against their critical strategic goals. That said, Dr. Deveny acknowledged that the $350 Million West Tower project at the Summa main campus in Akron will continue as planned. During a ceremony in May, the company broke ground just last month on the new West Tower. Construction is scheduled to be finished by Spring of 2019.

Summa Health currently employs 8,000 people throughout the area, making it Akron's largest employer. Of the 300 jobs that will be eliminated, Dr. Deveny mentioned in his memo that about half of them are currently filled within the system.  

Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan responded to the news, saying, "A successful, independently-owned Summa Health is key to the ongoing economic and physical wellbeing of our city and the region. Just as our community depends on the care and services Summa provides for its health and welfare; Summa cannot succeed without the support and trust of the community. I have pledged to continue to work with Dr. Deveny and the Summa leadership team to do everything necessary to ensure the organization remains a strong and independent pillar for years to come."

Summit County Executive Ilene Shapiro also released a statement on the Summa layoffs, saying, "Summa has been an anchor in our community for 125 years, and during that time Summa has provided care at the highest level to hundreds of thousands of Summit County and Northeast Ohio residents. However, the current climate in the health care industry is leading many organizations to re-evaluate their financial and operational models and make difficult decisions to maintain quality care." 

Published in Local

Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan, during a speech at Akron's Fire Station #2 Thursday morning, announced that he is proposing a quarter-percent income tax increase to be put on the November ballot. 

Mayor Horrigan cited several reasons for the "necessary increase," including deteriorating roads and Akron Police Department and Fire Department needs. "The City of Akron continues to lose about $15 Million every year from the elimination of fair tax sharing in the state of Ohio," the Mayor said. Since the Recession of 2008, Horrigan added, the city has lost a total of $80 Million in unrealized income tax revenue. 

If approved by City Council, the issue would be placed on the November ballot for Akron residents to vote on. The proposed increase would raise the current income tax rate of 2.25% to 2.5%. 

The City of Akron hasn't had a general income tax increase (see next paragraph) since 1981 for "essential city services", Horrigan said in a prepared release. He says the city desperately needs this proposed increase for new, updated police cruisers and fire trucks; to support the APD body camera database; and to improve roughly 45 miles worth of Akron roadways, just to name a few things.

Akron voters approved a boost in the municipal income tax by .25 percent in 2003 dedicated to fund an $800 million dollar, 15 year plan to rebuild local schools as Community Learning Centers by the Akron Public School district. That project has been underway but has been scaled back with the loss of student enrollment across the district. State funds are used as well as local funding generated by the Akron income tax percentage taken for the school rebuilding project.

Mayor Horrigan touted his adminstration's efforts to continually do "more with less," but says the increase is necessary to maintain safety efforts and keep up with regular road maintenance and repaving efforts. Akron Police Chief James Nice and Fire Chief Clarence Tucker were on hand for the Mayor's announcement Thursday, and they both expressed their full support for the tax increase.  

The Mayor will officially present his proposal to Akron City Council this coming Monday, June 26th. 

Below is the press release from the Mayor's office regarding the proposed increase: 

Akron, Ohio, June 22, 2017– Today, Mayor Horrigan announced his proposal for a ¼% earned income tax increase to fund capital and operating needs for police, fire/EMS, public service and roads in the City of Akron. The income tax proposal, if passed by City Council, would be placed on the November 7, 2017 ballot for approval by Akron voters.

“Over the last several years, the City of Akron has continued to do more with less. We have made cuts across the board, reduced personnel, and consolidated services to reflect the City’s revenue challenges. However, we simply cannot cut our way to prosperity,” Mayor Horrigan said of the proposal. “It has been 36 years since our last income tax increase for essential city services, and as we seek to grow our population and revitalize our neighborhoods, our city needs and deserves this funding. The time is now.”

On average, the funds would be spent between police (1/3), fire/EMS (1/3), and streets (1/3). “It is essential that we provide our police and fire/EMS personnel with the equipment and facilities they need to protect our neighborhoods and keep us safe. And, we simply cannot allow our roads to deteriorate further if we expect our neighborhoods and business districts to thrive,” Mayor Horrigan said.

The City of Akron has lost $15 million per year in fair tax-sharing from the State of Ohio and lost an estimated $80 million in unrealized income tax revenue since 2008, as a result of the recession. Without replacement funding, the City would be forced to make difficult budgeting decisions that would impact City services across the board.

“As promised, I’ve listened closely to the Akron community over the past two years, and the feedback I’ve received is clear—we must invest in the long-term vitality of our neighborhoods. This fair and reasonable increase will allow us to significantly improve streets across the city by paving an average of 43 more miles of roadway each year. It will provide the funding needed to maintain current public safety staffing levels and replace deteriorating equipment and facilities for our Police and Fire Departments.”

Police Chief James Nice and Fire Chief Clarence Tucker joined Mayor Horrigan to express their full support for the proposal and detail the dire needs of their departments—including the need to launch a body-worn camera data storage program, replace two aging fire stations, at least one pumper truck, and 63 police cruisers in poor condition.

The additional ¼% income tax only applies to income earned at a job and will not affect retirement/pension income, social security, or other government benefits. Two-thirds of the funding raised through income tax collection is paid by commuters who work in Akron but live in other communities. If successful, this proposal would raise Akron’s income tax to 2.5% – consistent with cities like Cleveland, Columbus and Dayton. The cost of the additional ¼% tax is $1.68/week, for a resident earning Akron’s median income of $35,000.

Council President Marilyn Keith joined the Mayor in making today’s announcement. “I am proud to stand with Mayor Horrigan in support of this reasonable and much-needed income tax proposal,” President Keith said. “These funds will support the core services we provide as a City, and address the issues most important to our residents – public safety, the quality of our roads and neighborhoods.”

The Mayor concluded by renewing his commitment to continue to control spending. “Even with an income tax increase, we must continue to explore ways to spend smarter, and prioritize funds where they’re needed most.” The legislation authorizing the ¼% income tax increase will be introduced to City Council on Monday, June 26th .

Published in Local
Tuesday, 28 February 2017 13:31

Akron Mayor's State of The City Address

During his "State of the City" address today, Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan promised to do more with less, and to continue efforts to revitalize the city of  despite continued economic challenges.

Horrigan pointed to action he's taken over the past year to reduce spending on city health care benefits, to increase collection of funds owed to the city, and to cut the cost of the city's massive sewer improvement project, as examples of progress.

He also pledged that support for basic city services such as police, fire, and road maintenance, will remain strong.

The State of the City event also included an appearance from Summit County Executive Ilene Shapiro, who presented a $50,000 check for a law school endowment to University of Akron President, Matthew Wilson.

The money will be used for scholarships, and was given to the University in honor of former County Executive, Russ Pry, who passed away last year.

 

Published in Local
Tuesday, 14 February 2017 11:30

Akron, Salvation Army Set Community Table

The City of Akron is teaming up with the Salvation Army for another extension of their Community Table. 

Summit Lake will play host to the latest effort to feed more Akron-area individuals and families that need help. 

“This program demonstrates what is possible when we work together,” Mayor Horrigan said in a press release. “The City is investing significant energy and resources into lifting up the Summit Lake neighborhood, and we are happy to open our doors to host a hot lunch every day of the week at our Summit Lake Community Center. We thank the Salvation Army for their contribution to improving the lives of our residents and look forward to expanding this partnership to other community locations." 

The Summit Lake meals will be offered Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. In addition, the Salvation Army of the Akron area continues to offer daily meals at their Barberton and downtown locations. 

Anyone looking for more information on the meals or volunteer opportunities can check SalvationArmyAkron.org for details. 

Published in Local
Tuesday, 25 October 2016 05:51

Akron Hikes Retiree Health Costs

As expected, the City of Akron is looking to rein-in it's so-called "legacy costs" -- otherwise known as health care for retirees. It doesn't impact the state-funded main health care but it does impact supplemental health care now provided at no cost for retirees and their benefits. Under proposed changes City Council approved the changes: supplemental costs would go from free to $30 monthly for single, $60 monthly for families. The changes also hit those who have spouses already eligible for health coverage from their own employee with a surcharge if the other coverage is declined.

- - -

(City of Akron) Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan and City Council President Marilyn Keith introduced four pieces of legislation in early September aimed at controlling legacy costs related to the City's supplemental retiree health care benefit. While City of Akron retirees' primary health care is provided through OPERS, OP&F and/or Medicare, the City of Akron has for many years provided additional, supplemental health care benefits, at no cost to the retirees or their dependents. However, as health care costs continue to escalate, the City was and is unable continue to provide this supplemental benefit at no cost. The City has investigated this matter and has determined that no other major city in Ohio provides this type of retiree benefit.

The Mayor's Blue Ribbon Panel identified legacy costs, the majority of which relate to this benefit, to be at $9 million in 2014. This burden on taxpayers was expected to steeply increase in the next several years if changes were not implemented. Panel members recommended that the City reform this supplemental retiree benefit to protect itself and City employees from significant long-term financial risk.

Mayor Horrigan diligently worked with his administration to investigate options for effectively reducing these costs while remaining fair to retirees, and partnered with President Keith to introduce legislation proposing the following changes:

- Determining to provide a supplemental benefit for employees who are hired on or before December 31, 2016;

- Requiring eligible retirees to contribute toward supplemental benefits at the same rate active, full-time, permanent employees contribute toward their health care benefits—$30 per month for singles and $60 per month for families;

- Providing for changes to the supplemental benefit plan that align with changes made to the benefit plan provided to active, full-time, permanent employees; and

- Providing for a spousal surcharge where an eligible retiree whose spouse qualifies for health insurance benefits from his/her own employer and chooses to decline that plan, the City of Akron retiree is required to pay a spousal surcharge to elect to include the spouse on the City's supplemental health care benefits.

After this initial legislation was introduced, Mayor Horrigan listened to feedback from the City's union leadership and responded by introducing alternative legislation, based on a union concept, that would have provided retirees with a stipend in lieu of any supplemental retiree health care benefit. The stipend option, which was withdrawn, would have provided similar financial savings to the City, but would have required retirees to seek out and acquire their own supplemental coverage.

On October 17, City Council passed the first phase of the plan—offering this supplemental benefit to only persons hired on or before December 31, 2016. Tonight, City Council passed the remaining three ordinances to implement Mayor Horrigan and President Keith's original proposal to reign in legacy costs. "This was the most responsible course of action the City could take," Council President Keith said Monday. "Retirees will not be losing any benefits with these changes. Instead, these reasonable cost-saving measures will reduce costs to taxpayers and put retirees on fair footing with current employees. It made perfect sense to me."

"It is one of our greatest responsibilities as City leaders to ensure that our City will be on solid financial footing, now and into the future," Mayor Horrigan said. "I deeply value the service of our current and retired employees and weigh that against the needs and costs placed on all City residents. Based on the findings of the Blue Ribbon Panel and the data provided by our consultants, I knew that doing nothing was not an option. I'm pleased that the members of City Council appreciated the reasonableness and necessity of these changes, and investigated and implemented them with due diligence. As we move forward, I will continue to find responsible, resourceful, and efficient ways to update our policies and practices in order to safeguard taxpayer dollars while ensuring the ongoing financial health and welfare of our City for this and future generations."

City retirees should look for detailed communication from the City's Human Resources Department in the coming weeks with additional information on the how these changes will be implemented, and should contact the Employee Benefits Office of the Human Resources Department at (330) 375-2700 with any questions.

Published in Local
Friday, 02 September 2016 16:13

Retired Akron Fire Chief To Be Interim Chief

A retired former Akron fire chief will fill in as chief again, after the retirement of Chief Ed Hiltbrand.

Larry Bunner retired in 2011, after being promoted to chief in 2007.

He'll be interim chief through the end of this year.

Akron mayor Dan Horrigan and city officials will begin the process of hiring a new fire chief.

(City of Akron, news release) Mayor Dan Horrigan announced today the appointment of Larry Bunner as interim Fire Chief of the Akron Fire Department (AFD) effective Tuesday, Sept. 6. Bunner replaces retiring Chief Ed Hiltbrand whose last day is Sept. 3.

Bunner retired from the Akron Fire Department January 7, 2011 after 38 ½ years of
distinguished service to the citizens of Akron. He joined AFD in June 1972 as a firefighter. Six years later he was promoted to lieutenant, then to captain in 1986, district chief in 1991 and deputy fire chief, January 1996. Bunner was promoted to chief in March 2007.

"Larry brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the position," said Mayor Horrigan. "I am grateful he has agreed to serve as our interim chief through the end of the year as we carefully work through a progressive process beginning with an internal search for the right candidate."

Bunner will be sworn-in as interim fire chief on Tuesday, September 6. The Mayor will work closely with Deputy Mayor of Public Safety Charles Brown and Human Resources Director Don Rice and to identify, interview and select the next fire chief.

Published in Local

As the city begins to ready itself for the celebration of LeBron James bringing a title to Northeast Ohio,  there's plenty of excitement in the air.

Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan came on the Sam Bourquin Show Thursday to talk about how people can be a part of the celebration down at Lock 3 in Downtown Akron.

Mayor Horrigan says it'll be a historic event for the people of Akron and beyond to celebrate not only a championship, but a champion.

"There's been a lot of planning the last few days to get this event together," Mayor Horrigan said. "It's going to be a chance for people to celebrate with our hometown hero."

 

The event including parking is free. For live coverage of the event, listen to 1590 WAKR, WAKR.net, and check our Facebook and Twitter pages as well.

Published in Sam and Brad

The city of Akron's Blue Ribbon panel report has gotten a lot of reaction since it landed on the desk of Akron mayor Dan Horrigan.

Most of the feedback has been positive, but one group has concerns about one recommendation, about possible privatization of the city's utilities.

Greg Coleridge, director of the Northeast Ohio Friends Service Committee, says Akron voters earlier rejected selling the city's sewer system, which was part of former mayor Don Plusquellic's "Sewers for Scholarships" plan.

He says the city would lose control and input with private utility companies based in other states or even countries...particularly water companies headquartered in other countries.

Overall, Coleridge agrees with other recommendations by the Blue Ribbon panel.

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(Northeast Ohio Friends Servce Committee) Open Letter to Mayor Dan Horrigan and Akron City Council Regarding Blue Ribbon Task Force Report

February 8, 2016

Greetings!

We write in response to the February 1, 2016 Blue Ribbon Task Force report.

We understand and commend the desire and need to have an outside ad hoc group assess
the current conditions of the city and the present structure and policies of the city
government, as well as offer recommendations for improvement.

There is much in the report with which we agree. Many of the challenges Akron faces
are, as the report states, due to external political and economic conditions that are shared
by other cities — namely deindustrialization, federal and state budget cuts, and the recent
economic Recession.

We would point out that each of these realities has been caused in no small degree by the
growing power and rights of business corporations and the super wealthy few. They've
exerted political and economic influence over public policies and the economy in support
of tax cuts, subsidies, perks, contracts and reductions of regulations which have further
consolidated their power and rights and increased their fortunes. The losers, of course,
have been programs, policies and people in urban, rural and suburban areas, including
Akron — specifically the poor, elderly, persons of color, working class and differently
abled.

Not all of Akron's current problems are due, however, to external factors. Some have
been self-inflicted. The past decision by the Administration to fight the EPA over the
city's combined sewer overflow resulted in substantial federal dollars left on the table
that now must come out of the pockets of Akron water and sewer customers.

The Task Force report asserts that, "[t]he single largest challenge facing the City is its
financial condition." We agree. It's appropriate, therefore, that many of its
recommendations address ways to reduce costs or increase income.

Prior to listing any specific recommendations, the report wisely declares, "some of them
will require further study; others will require additional resources (human and capital);
and still others just may not work at this time."

We respectfully offer that one of the recommendations in the later category, that "just
may not work at this time," that we believe should not work out ANY time, is selling,
leasing or transferring the city's water and sewer system – a suggestion referenced on
page 17.

Public utilities should remain public by the mere fact that to be more effective and
efficient there should be one provider. Akron voters overwhelmingly approved in 2008 to
keep the city's public sewer system public – under the control of We the People. Voters
understood that to privatize/corporatize public utilities more often than not increases
costs, reduces services, and results in the lay off of public employees. And in every single
case, turning over a public asset to a for-profit corporation, especially if headquartered
outside the community, state, if not country, significantly reduces public control – i.e.
democracy.

We believe former Mayor Tom Johnson, promoter of the public Cleveland electric power
system, said it best more than a century ago:
"I believe in the municipal ownership of all public service monopolies...for if you do not
own them they will, in time, own you. They will rule your politics, corrupt your
institutions, and finally destroy your liberties."

First Energy Corporation is a classic example of the perils of a private corporation
controlling what should be public provision of our electrical energy --ruling our state
politics via their lobbying and campaign contributions/investments and adversely
influencing (if not corrupting) the institution of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio
(PUCO) – with the result of high rates to pay for antiquated and environmentally
destructive fossil fuel plants while opposing the movement toward renewable energy.

While ostensibly a public official, the Emergency Manager appointed by the Michigan
Governor to run the public water system in Flint, MI was unaccountable and unelected.
Running the public water system like a business is what led to the tragic poisoning of the
residents of that city.

Our concluding message is simple, as reinforced by over 60% of Akron voters in 2008:
Keep Public Utilities Public.

Thank you for your consideration.

Respectfully,

John Fuller
Clerk, Northeast Ohio American Friends Service Committee

Greg Coleridge
Director, Northeast Ohio American Friends Service Committee

Published in Local

The City of Akron Blue Ribbon panel report is now being studied by Mayor Dan Horrigan.

The panel spent the last three months studying the city's government to make suggestions for where Horrigan should start as mayor.

Tim Ochsenhirt was chairman of the Blue Ribbon Panel. He says it all starts with the city's financial picture when trying to determine what can be done next.

"To recognize the position we're in now, and to try to determine how they can best, absent a tax increase, that's always an easy way," Ochsenhirt tells WAKR's Jasen Sokol, "how we might accomplish better financial management of our funds and assets and resources right now."

Ochsenhirt says to fund suggested improvements, it takes money. But a tax increase is not on the table.

"There are) ways to try to increase revenue by closing a few doors that are open, and taking some new ideas, maybe having less subsidies on behalf of the city of Akron," Ochsenhirt says.

Council member at large Linda Omobien was the only city council member on the panel. She talks about the city's financial challenges.

"The financial staff have done a pretty good job of managing our financial situation," Omobien tells WAKR's Jasen Sokol, "but we really need to look at ways to start saving revenue, using our assets to try to find more revenue to come into the city."

Omobien also says a tax increase is not the answer. 

Published in Local