Tony Mazur

Tony Mazur

Three teenagers were gunned down in the 400 block of Noah Avenue over the weekend. Due to the rash of gun violence in the city of late, the mayor and chief of police addressed the bloodshed in the area on Monday afternoon.

Dan Horrigan, the mayor of Akron, called into the Ray Horner Morning Show to recap what was said during his Monday press conference, as well as a slew of other topics, such as the end of First Night Akron.

Horrigan also touched on the future of the now-vacant site at Rolling Acres, as well as the events surrounding the All-American Soap Box Derby.

The city of Akron has seen its share of ups lately, but one constant has been going downhill: the All-American Soap Box Derby, of course.

Mark Gerberich is in his second full year as president of the Soap Box Derby, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to go over the events this week through the 21st. Gerberich says they have racers from all over the globe, not just the United States. However, some come from a family of racers, dating back five generations, and they spend their vacations in Akron.

The Soap Box Derby is not just about cars and racing. The education side of it has its appeal expanded into China and Australia.

Summer is halfway over, and while students have just over a month to soak up the sun, educators and administrators are gearing up for a new school year come August.

One of the biggest topics in education of late has not been about the curriculum, but student safety. Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss school safety and the ongoing rhetoric surrounding the topic. Weingarten is not in favor of arming teachers, which was a suggestion spawning from the tragedy in Parkland, Florida,

Weingarten believes the issue is certainly societal, and does not rule out veterans who would offer their services to increase security, but arming teachers is not the answer, according to her. She also believes schools need to increase their mental health services.

Automobile manufacturers have vacated the Rust Belt for decades in favor of greener or overseas pastures. Many communities have seen the plant shut down and families out of work, and the towns have yet to recover.

However, Twinsburg is a success story on how to revitalize a town after a major business closes. Ted Yates, the mayor of Twinsburg, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the near and distant future of the new Cornerstone Business Park. Built on the site of the old Chrysler plant, which vacated in 2010, residents have and will see companies such as FedEx, Amazon, O’Reilly Auto Parts, and others be on the site.

The location is set on Route 82, between I-480 and I-271, not far from the Macedonia border in northern Summit County.

A controversial topic throughout President Trump's campaign, and especially recently, has been immigration and what to do in the near and distant future.

Immigration attorney from the International Institute, Farhad Sethna, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the recent events. Locally, Sethna says most of the immigrants that have come to Summit County are documented and went through the International Institute, but other issues may occur down the road with undocumented individuals.

On the national side, Sethna is sympathetic toward those coming into the country, mainly due to the language barrier that affects the children across the border. He believes the policies, or lack thereof, have become "chaotic" in nature.

Questions have risen over time on the sewer project in Akron, mainly about the safety of the water supply as well as the cost for the residents.

The mayor of Akron, Dan Horrigan, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to answer some questions on the project. Horrigan says the city is trying to find new and different ways to drive down the costs of the sewer bills, and they are viewing the age of some of the town's sewers.

Another point of interest with the mayor is the demolition of the Rubber Bowl, which is in the process of coming down. While he shares many folks' feelings and memories on the facility, Horrigan cautions thrill-seekers from entering the premises, and people will be prosecuted. City planners are actively finding creative ways to develop the land next to Derby Downs and Akron-Fulton Airport.

It has been a busy few weeks, but Dr. John Green is settling into his new job as president of the University of Akron. Dr. Green, also the director of the Bliss Institute and a frequent guest on the Ray Horner Morning Show, joined the program in studio to discuss what is on his plate. A major focus of Dr. Green’s is finding creative ways for enrollment. Other areas of focus have been working with the athletic department on the use of InfoCision Stadium, as well as fighting the deficit that has loomed over the school.

It’s over. The Cleveland Cavaliers’ strange season, filled with highs and lows, came to a close Friday night with a four-game sweep by the Golden State Warriors.

John Michael, the voice of the Cavs, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to reflect on the season that was, including the team before the trades, the team after, and how they were able to keep it together to make it to their fourth-consecutive NBA Finals.

As far as the team going forward, Michael believes this all hinges on the decision from LeBron James. Regardless of if LeBron stays or goes, the voice of the Cavs believes the squad will have a “vastly different look.”

It has been a half century since the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy inside Los Angeles’s Ambassador Hotel. With the events that occurred in the immediate and distant future, how much different would the country be?

Dr. Kevin Kern, historian at the University of Akron, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the events leading up to Bobby Kennedy’s assassination. With Lyndon Johnson withdrawing from the 1968 presidential race, Kennedy stormed through the primaries and may have been a favorite with the DNC.

Dr. Kern also discussed the mood of 1968, beginning with the Tet Offensive, leading to the assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King and Kennedy, as well as the racial tensions across cities such as Detroit and Cleveland.

It has been almost two years since the little-used Innerbelt was closed, but its use in the present day is increasing.

Akron mayor Dan Horrigan joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about a slew of local topics, including what is happening with the present and future of the Innerbelt area. Horrigan talked about the temporary green space that has popped up in the area, and he says there is “progress” in

Horrigan also talked about the OHSAA softball championships being held at Firestone this weekend, believing it to be big economically for the region. The mayor also expressed sympathy for those affected by the tunnel project.

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