Hurricane Florence continues to inflict devastation on the Carolinas, with both water levels and death tolls rising. What can residents in Northeast Ohio do and how can they be of assistance? The Ray Horner Morning Show caught up with some folks with local ties to give the listeners a look into what is happening first-hand in that region. Jim McIntyre - American Red Cross

Mark Durbin - FirstEnergy

Steve Bosso - Retired Twinsburg fire inspector

Jim Mantel - Retired radio personality living in North Carolina

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Monday, 17 September 2018 20:01

Business of the Week: Bober Markey Fedorovich

Each week, the Ray Horner Morning Show spotlights a local business that assures their dedication to the community.

For the inaugural edition, Ray sat down with Dale Ruther, partner with Bober Markey Fedorovich in Fairlawn. Ruther has been with BMF for over 35 years, and the company has been in business since 1959. Bober Markey Fedorovich is an independent CPA and business advisory firm that serves the Greater Akron area and beyond.

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17 years have passed since the terror attacks on American soil, which claimed over 3,000 lives. In the nearly two decades since September 11th, 2001, what additional precautions have been made to ensure our continued safety?

According to SACS Security president Tim Dimoff, a lot has gone into further security. Dimoff joined the Ray Horner Morning Show on the 9/11 anniversary to discuss how Homeland Security and other intelligence agencies have snuffed out potential attacks throughout the years and will continue to do so. He points to taking the fight overseas to the Middle East has really helped snuff out terrorist groups, especially due to the use of drones.

Though a controversial topic today, Dimoff also says increased immigration screening has helped prevent attacks, mainly from countries on the “watch” list.

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Wednesday, 29 August 2018 08:42

AUDIO: CAK President on Airport Expansion

Akron-Canton Airport will get a new facelift. A $34 million facelift, to be precise.

Rick McQueen, the soon-to-be-outgoing president and CEO of the Akron-Canton Airport, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the changes happening at the facility. McQueen says the plans are to expand and update the airport for the modern-day traveler, complete with charging stations for cell phones and new restaurants and other amenities.

McQueen, who will be retiring at the end of 2018, believes the upgrades will help meet the needs of today for the regional airport, which opened its first terminal in 1955 and expanded seven years later. The project looks to be done in late 2019 or into early 2020.

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Last month, Brian Thomas, who has been with Akron AAA for nearly forty years, said farewell to the company he helped build. Now, his brother, Kevin, takes over the post.

Kevin Thomas joined the Ray Horner Morning Show about taking over as president of Akron AAA. He has been with the company for 35 years and worked various jobs inside the company, yet did not foresee he would take on the role of president.

As far as travel goes for the Labor Day weekend, Thomas says Friday is still this big launch day on the roads. He urges commuters to put down the electronic devices inside the vehicle and to focus on the roads. Thomas also shared many other travel tips for drivers both young and old, and he promoted the AAA app, which can be downloaded onto any smartphone.

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The first day of school has descended upon Akron Public Schools. A clean slate, a fresh start for many, whether they are a student, educator, administrator, or even a facility itself.

David James, the superintendent of Akron Public Schools, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in studio to discuss the scholastic year ahead. James and Horner talked about the new academies that have popped up recently, as well as the I Promise School and Case CLC.

James also touched on the athletics and the arts in Akron Public Schools across the board, as well as the steady enrollment.

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A slew of changes are happening at the University of Akron. A total of 80 degree programs will be phased out due to declining enrollment and the changing college environment.

What will this mean for the students and faculty? Dr. John Green, interim president of the University of Akron, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to touch on the changes. One of the big questions surrounding the cuts are if jobs will be lost, but that is not the case. Green says the faculty members will only shift their job titles and will remain employed.

The majority of the cuts are master’s and bachelor’s programs. Students in the programs on the outs will be able to complete their degree.

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It is a new week, and a variety of topics have come across the desk of Akron mayor Dan Horrigan.

First, the discussion on the present and future of Akron-Fulton Airport, which took place on the Ray Horner Morning Show. Horrigan announced that not only will the airport stay, but it plans to expand with a partnership with Stark State College.

Another topic has been the moving up of the primaries to May from September, which was shot down by city council, but Horrigan presses on. The mayor also talked about the final Bridgestone Invitational and how the new tournament will affect the area in 2019.

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Bob Hope was one of America’s most celebrated and honored entertainers of the twentieth century, and his life spanned that entire century. A native of Cleveland, Ohio who ventured to the West Coast, Hope accomplished almost everything in the entertainment business, from vaudeville to radio, to film to television, as well as entertaining troops from World War II till the Persian Gulf War.

So why is Hope’s legacy forgotten among today’s youth? Bob Ethington from the Akron-Summit County Public Library’s pop culture division joined the Ray Horner Morning Show, guest-hosted by Tony Mazur, to talk about the life of “Ski Snoot.” Ethington believes Baby Boomers began resenting Hope for his war-hawkish commentary during the Vietnam War, as well as his refusal to fade into the sunset.

On the flip side, Ethington talked of Groucho Marx and the Marx Brothers and how they were embraced by the Boomers of the 1960s and ‘70s.

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The final Bridgestone Invitational is rapidly approaching, and while many are sad the WGC is moving to Memphis, everyone involved is very excited.

Don Padgett III, the Executive Director of the Bridgestone Invitational, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to answer questions, comments, and concerns surrounding next week’s tournament. The hope of many on the inside, as well as fans on the outside, was if Tiger Woods could qualify for the Bridgestone. With his finish at the British Open, he is ranked 50th on the PGA Tour and thus qualifying him to play at Firestone.

Padgett also talked about the charities and volunteers, the field of players, and looking ahead to next year’s tournament when the senior players will pass through Akron.

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The city of Akron has seen its share of ups lately, but one constant has been going downhill: the All-American Soap Box Derby, of course.

Mark Gerberich is in his second full year as president of the Soap Box Derby, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to go over the events this week through the 21st. Gerberich says they have racers from all over the globe, not just the United States. However, some come from a family of racers, dating back five generations, and they spend their vacations in Akron.

The Soap Box Derby is not just about cars and racing. The education side of it has its appeal expanded into China and Australia.

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Summer is halfway over, and while students have just over a month to soak up the sun, educators and administrators are gearing up for a new school year come August.

One of the biggest topics in education of late has not been about the curriculum, but student safety. Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss school safety and the ongoing rhetoric surrounding the topic. Weingarten is not in favor of arming teachers, which was a suggestion spawning from the tragedy in Parkland, Florida,

Weingarten believes the issue is certainly societal, and does not rule out veterans who would offer their services to increase security, but arming teachers is not the answer, according to her. She also believes schools need to increase their mental health services.

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Automobile manufacturers have vacated the Rust Belt for decades in favor of greener or overseas pastures. Many communities have seen the plant shut down and families out of work, and the towns have yet to recover.

However, Twinsburg is a success story on how to revitalize a town after a major business closes. Ted Yates, the mayor of Twinsburg, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the near and distant future of the new Cornerstone Business Park. Built on the site of the old Chrysler plant, which vacated in 2010, residents have and will see companies such as FedEx, Amazon, O’Reilly Auto Parts, and others be on the site.

The location is set on Route 82, between I-480 and I-271, not far from the Macedonia border in northern Summit County.

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A controversial topic throughout President Trump's campaign, and especially recently, has been immigration and what to do in the near and distant future.

Immigration attorney from the International Institute, Farhad Sethna, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the recent events. Locally, Sethna says most of the immigrants that have come to Summit County are documented and went through the International Institute, but other issues may occur down the road with undocumented individuals.

On the national side, Sethna is sympathetic toward those coming into the country, mainly due to the language barrier that affects the children across the border. He believes the policies, or lack thereof, have become "chaotic" in nature.

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Questions have risen over time on the sewer project in Akron, mainly about the safety of the water supply as well as the cost for the residents.

The mayor of Akron, Dan Horrigan, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to answer some questions on the project. Horrigan says the city is trying to find new and different ways to drive down the costs of the sewer bills, and they are viewing the age of some of the town's sewers.

Another point of interest with the mayor is the demolition of the Rubber Bowl, which is in the process of coming down. While he shares many folks' feelings and memories on the facility, Horrigan cautions thrill-seekers from entering the premises, and people will be prosecuted. City planners are actively finding creative ways to develop the land next to Derby Downs and Akron-Fulton Airport.

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It has been a busy few weeks, but Dr. John Green is settling into his new job as president of the University of Akron. Dr. Green, also the director of the Bliss Institute and a frequent guest on the Ray Horner Morning Show, joined the program in studio to discuss what is on his plate. A major focus of Dr. Green’s is finding creative ways for enrollment. Other areas of focus have been working with the athletic department on the use of InfoCision Stadium, as well as fighting the deficit that has loomed over the school.

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It’s over. The Cleveland Cavaliers’ strange season, filled with highs and lows, came to a close Friday night with a four-game sweep by the Golden State Warriors.

John Michael, the voice of the Cavs, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to reflect on the season that was, including the team before the trades, the team after, and how they were able to keep it together to make it to their fourth-consecutive NBA Finals.

As far as the team going forward, Michael believes this all hinges on the decision from LeBron James. Regardless of if LeBron stays or goes, the voice of the Cavs believes the squad will have a “vastly different look.”

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It has been a half century since the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy inside Los Angeles’s Ambassador Hotel. With the events that occurred in the immediate and distant future, how much different would the country be?

Dr. Kevin Kern, historian at the University of Akron, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the events leading up to Bobby Kennedy’s assassination. With Lyndon Johnson withdrawing from the 1968 presidential race, Kennedy stormed through the primaries and may have been a favorite with the DNC.

Dr. Kern also discussed the mood of 1968, beginning with the Tet Offensive, leading to the assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King and Kennedy, as well as the racial tensions across cities such as Detroit and Cleveland.

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It has been almost two years since the little-used Innerbelt was closed, but its use in the present day is increasing.

Akron mayor Dan Horrigan joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about a slew of local topics, including what is happening with the present and future of the Innerbelt area. Horrigan talked about the temporary green space that has popped up in the area, and he says there is “progress” in

Horrigan also talked about the OHSAA softball championships being held at Firestone this weekend, believing it to be big economically for the region. The mayor also expressed sympathy for those affected by the tunnel project.

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The city of Barberton continues to find new and innovative ways of revamping its image.

Bill Judge, the mayor of Barberton, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the infrastructure in the city. From road repairs to retaining businesses, Judge believes the town’s infrastructure is quite healthy. PPG, BW, and Stark State serve as anchors inside the city limits.

Memorial Day weekend is a nice time to grab a free bike in the Metro Parks, according to Judge and Ray. Barberton has three bike stations for the trails, and they are open through November.

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Cuyahoga Falls has a number of destinations for locals to check out, and those areas continue to improve.

Don Walters, the mayor of Cuyahoga Falls, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about what is happening near Portage Crossing and down by the waterfront. First, Walters talked about Front Street opening up for vehicle traffic, and how businesses want to be a part of the revamped area. Down the street off Graham Road, Menards has come together, and the mayor said it was a long time coming for the arrival of the big box store.

As far as the talk of a new high school for Cuyahoga Falls, Walters says a measure will be on the ballots in November 2019 for voters. He believes a new school will be beneficial for security and monetary reasons, saying it will end up being cheaper in the long run to build a new facility than to sink money into an aging one.

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Memorial Day weekend is upon us, and many who have endured cabin fever throughout the cold months are looking to flee town for a few days. However, it is handy to have a few pointers at one's disposal.

Brian Thomas, the president of Akron AAA, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to go over some travel tips for the busy weekend. Thomas says a record number of travelers will be on the roads this weekend, with a figure around 42 million people in their cars. He says the time to avoid being on the freeways is during rush hour on Thursday, with many getting a jump on the long weekend.

Akron AAA has two locations in the area, with one downtown on Rosa Parks Drive and the other in Fairlawn.

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After over thirty years and 369 wins under his belt, John Gramuglia has decided to pass the torch.

The head coach of the Wadsworth wrestling team joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to look back on his decorated career with the Grizzlies. Gramuglia felt this was the right time to step aside and give the program some new blood. He feels the program must continue to evolve, and knows it is in good hands.

Gramuglia will not be going far. Though he won’t be head coach anymore, he plans on guiding the team in a less hands-on role, and will help further develop the youth program.

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A very unpredictable spring has led to a brutal allergy season for many. Patients are desperate for relief, and many want to know the balance between under and overmedication. Two specialists from Cleveland Clinic/Akron General joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in the thick of allergy season. First, Dr. Tim Brown discussed the priciness of treatments and how and where to find them. Dr. Bela Faltay, an allergy specialist, talked about inexpensive over-the-counter remedies and allergy shots.

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The snowblowers have been put away, and the snow brushes have been sent to the trunks. The focus in May shifts from the chilly weather to sunburn.

Dr. Jim Libecco from Allied Dermatology in Fairlawn joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss proper skincare as the weather warms up. Dr. Libecco stresses the use of sunscreen when being exposed to any sun for an extended period. Application for sunscreen should be a half hour before exposure, and should be used every two to three hours. Peak hours for sun are between 10 AM and 4 PM.

Per Dr. Libecco, a checkup with a dermatologist or primary care physician is suggested once a year.

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Wednesday, 02 May 2018 08:48

AUDIO: Kenmore To Get a Facelift

While downtown Akron is getting renovated, other neighborhoods are seeing facelifts of their own. One of those areas seeing the revitalization is Kenmore.

John Buntin, the owner Kenmore Komics and president of the Kenmore Chamber of Commerce, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the present and future of the boulevard, from the businesses to the street itself. The city of Akron is investing in the area, and Buntin feels this partnership with the city will be highly beneficial down the road. In fact, Buntin and others are attempting to get a historical listing for the district to take advantage of federal tax dollars.

Buntin says the first priority on the list to improve Kenmore is to repave the street, which will occur sometime in June.

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The first week of May is Law Week with the Akron Bar Association. On Monday to kick off the week, the Ray Horner Morning Show welcomed a slew of attorneys to speak about their expertise. Dean Carro - Akron Bar Association

Farhad Sethna - Immigration

Linda Ulinski - Estate & Will Planning

Debora Ruby - Marital Law

Nancy Holland - Workplace Harassment

Elizabeth Knowles - Immigration & Human Rights Law

Jeff Laybourne - Defense Attorney

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The uncertainty on the future of the Akron Racers has been a topic of speculation for months. However, a recent settlement has provided a sliver of clarity for 2019.

Joey Arrietta joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to update the listeners on the goings on these last few months. Like the Cleveland Browns in 1996, the goal for Joey was to retain the Racers name, colors, and tradition, and that has been the case for the Racers, as well. The new incarnation of the Racers will not have any connection to the Cleveland Comets.

Looking back on what has been built since 1999, Joey is proud of the potential for a new team in 2019. She looks forward to speaking with local businesses and investors, especially with the lure of historic Firestone Stadium and the Racers foundation.

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It was announced some weeks back at Matthew Wilson, then-president at the University of Akron, was stepping down from his position, and the search continues to fill those big shoes.

In the meantime, Dr. John Green, director of the Bliss Institute and professor of political science, has been named as the interim president at the University of Akron. Dr. Green joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about his appointment to his new position and how he plans on keeping business going as a new president search goes on. One of the strong points of Dr. Green being the president has been his tenure at the college, which has been more than thirty years.

Dr. Green also praised the job Matthew Wilson did after the fallout of Scott Scarborough two years prior.

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On Monday, Akron City Council announced the age for the sale of tobacco products have been raised from 18 to 21. Originally proposed by Tamiyka Rose, Akron becomes the tenth city in the state of Ohio to become a “Tobacco 21” town.

Akron mayor Dan Horrigan joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to share his thoughts. Though he understands any pushback the city could receive, the mayor feels this is a larger part of the evolution of the culture, and by curbing the use of tobacco, it will help promote a healthier society. Jeff Fusco is a part of city council, and he felt that the lack of availability of the products, based on research, would lessen the amount of teen smoking rates.

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Tuesday, 17 April 2018 07:52

AUDIO: Experts Speak on Syria Strike

On Friday, President Trump announced the United States carried out a strike on Syria, coming off the heels of a chemical attack that occurred on its own citizens earlier in the week. So what is next? Was this a one-time message-sending strike, or could this lead to a full-scale war?

The Ray Horner Morning Show welcomed three international experts to speak on this subject.

Dr. John Green

Jeff McCausland

Dr. Steven Hook

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This week has shown some uncertain futures for two long-time staples in the Akron area.

Dan Horrigan, the mayor of Akron, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss a few local topics, one of them being the sale of the Akron Beacon Journal to GateHouse Media. Horrigan believes in a strong local newspaper to hold the politicians accountable, and has said the Beacon is part of the fabric of the city. Once the sale goes through, the mayor wants to sit with the new owners to discuss their approach to journalism and the business community.

Horrigan also touched on the Bridgestone Invitational, which will leave town after 2018. The mayor is disappointed that the Bridgestone will not return for 2019, especially with how it affects the local economy and the Northeast Ohio Golf Charities. He says the city will work on bringing a new tournament to town, with the hopes of the top golfers in the world coming back, as well.

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For the fourth-straight year since LeBron James has returned from South Beach, the Cleveland Cavaliers are embarking on another playoff run.

John Michael, the radio voice of the Cavs, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to preview the playoffs and the team’s opponent. Michael says the rotations and matchups will depend on their opponent, and regardless, Tyronn Lue will typically rotate nine players in the game. The final game of the season will mark the first time in LeBron’s career he will have played in all 82 contests, and Michael made a case for him being the MVP.

The Cavs’ voice also talked about other potential foes in the Eastern Conference, including young and hungry teams such as the Milwaukee Bucks and Philadelphia 76ers.

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A staple in the world of is making his jump from classic rock radio to reality television. And he is taking his family with him.

Eddie Money called into the Ray Horner Morning Show, guest-hosted by Tony Mazur, to promote his new reality show, Real Money, which debuts April 8th on AXS-TV. Real Money follows the Money family around, which includes his wife, Laurie, five kids, and eight animals. Click this link to view a two-minute trailer for the new show.

In addition to the new show, Money also talked about his love of the Dodgers, whom he has followed since his days of living in Brooklyn. The 69-year-old singer also chatted about the comeback of vinyl records, his adoration for performing in Northeast Ohio, and a look back at his hit songs, which are still in heavy rotation on rock radio.

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After a shockingly brief appearance in the postseason, the 2018 Cleveland Indians are fired up and ready for the regular season to begin.

Bob DiBiasio, VP with the Indians, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to preview the opening day roster. One of the questions on the team has been Michael Brantley, and though he will start the year on the disabled list, Bobby D says the veteran outfielder has not experienced any setbacks. Other topics of discussion are the continued strength of the pitching staff and retaining Mike Napoli in the organization.

The Indians take on the Seattle Mariners Thursday night for the regular season opener. Progressive Field opens up eight days later on April 6th, when the Tribe takes on the Kansas City Royals.

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It is only Wednesday, but there have already been a number of tragic stories. However, both have been contained as of Wednesday morning.

Tim Dimoff, the president and CEO of SACS Security Consulting, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the events that occurred in Austin, Texas and Great Mills, Maryland. In the Austin case, Dimoff talks about how the suspect’s cell phone and other devices left somewhat of a paper trail that led the authorities to him. As for the Maryland school shooting, Dimoff talks about how the resource officer neutralized the threat and took down the shooter, leaving the shooter as the lone fatality.

As of this morning, just before this interview was aired, the Austin suspect was identified as 24-year-old Mark Anthony Conditt.

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Children in the future will know what it was like to be a Toys ‘R’ Us kid. But it is not just the toy stores that are being affected.

Jonathan Walsh, consumer reporter at WEWS/News 5 in Cleveland, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the change in shopping habits. Walsh believes today's consumer is very concerned with convenience shopping, which does not bode well for the traditional brick-and-mortar stores such as Toys ‘R’ Us, Claire’s, and Sam’s Club, which are either closing some or all of their facilities in the near future. He says those stores failed to embrace the online shopping boom, and their downfalls are evident.

Shopping habits are changing across the board, not just in retail. Walsh mentions the trend in “curbside” grocery shopping, where employees of the store pick out items on a list made ahead of time. Even stores like Target and Walmart have introduced groceries into their facilities for the consumer’s convenience.

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The trees of Issue 4 are beginning to bear fruit. One of those fruits is a new fire station in Middlebury.

Akron mayor Dan Horrigan joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about replacing fire station #2 over on East Market Street. Horrigan has stressed the monies from Issue 4 will be split into thirds, and fire is one of those categories. The other two are police and streets, and more than 54 miles of road will be resurfaced this year.

The mayor also talked about the Hamburger Festival hiatus. Due to the construction downtown, Horrigan believes the Hamburger Festival would have had a difficult time operating, though other events at Lock 3 should not be affected.

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The All-American Soap Box Derby continues to spread its name and purpose across the globe. A few months back it was Australia. Now China is getting into the mix.

Mark Gerberich, the president and CEO of the AASBD, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the derby heading east. Gerberich believes it is a great opportunity for the derby to head to Australia, China, and beyond, from both a brand-building and education standpoint. In China, the goal is for students to experience a taste of American culture, and, down the road, they hope Chinese students will come through Akron for summer camps.

The 81st FirstEnergy All-American Soap Box Derby will be from July 15th-21st at Derby Downs, next door to the Rubber Bowl and Akron-Fulton Airport.

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Over the last decade, the push to revitalize some of Akron’s non-downtown neighborhoods is beginning to pay dividends. One such neighborhood is Highland Square, which appears to be the model for other areas.

Planning director Jason Segedy joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the success of Highland Square. Segedy believes the mix of housing and retail has been the key for Highland Square, along with the Bohemian, artistic vibe the area gives off. It is one of the few areas where the old houses remain in solid condition, and is a model of stable property value.

Other neighborhoods have been undergoing facelifts, and some could look very different over the course of a decade. West Hill, which is down the street from Highland Square, could see a revitalization soon, as could Kenmore, North Hill, and what was once the Innerbelt.

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The city of Stow has two large retail districts, but the downtown area does not have much development. That may soon change.

At-large councilman Mike Rasor joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to showcase his ideas for a downtown Stow. Rasor says he put out a poll on social media, and response for downtown development was overwhelmingly positive. The idea is for an entertainment and retail district to be set up on the northwest corner of the Darrow Road and Graham Road intersection.

Rasor says this will be a few years away, but the city is talking to developers right now.

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In the last two decades, there has been a rash of school shootings, and a common theme with them is that they seem to occur in suburban areas. These suburbs get shaken for a long time, in that many would never believe something like a school shooting would happen in their community.

Norton, Ohio shares some characteristics with towns such as Columbine, Chardon, and Parkland, so what is that community doing to prevent gun violence? Dana Addis, the superintendent of Norton schools, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss what his district is doing to help the safety of their students. Addis says they are conducting meetings with students and doing everything they can to ensure their safety. He even says students are communication to get a better understanding of each other.

One of the factors holding up the process nationwide is the cost of added security. Addis brings up the stat that only four percent of schools use metal detectors due to the high costs.

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Thursday, 01 March 2018 07:28

Wahoo Week, Day 3

Wahoo Week is almost over, but that means we are getting closer to the official start of baseball season. Ray Horner is still out in Goodyear, Arizona, and he has grabbed interviews with members of the Indians, on-field personnel and off.

Bradley Zimmer - Outfielder Sandy Alomar Jr. - First Base Coach Mike Napoli - First Baseman/DH Eric Hasse - Minor League Catcher Edwin Encarnacion - DH/First Baseman Carl Willis - Pitching Coach Bob DiBiasio - VP, Public Relations Bobby Bradley - Minor League Outfielder

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Some two weeks after the settlement with Nexus, some residents of Green are none too please with their city’s response.

Green mayor Gerard Neugebauer joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to address his residents’ concerns. Ultimately, Neugebauer said the initial goal was to move the pipeline out of town, and because that could not happen, he is disappointed with the outcome. However, he says the city’s mission now is to work with Nexus to make the pipe safe for everyone.

Originally, the pipe was supposed to travel six-and-a-half miles through the city. The pushback on Nexus caused the pipe to be extended to eight miles, but through a more rural area to the south than what was initially planned. The mayor says if any residents see anything suspicious with the pipeline, they should call (330) 896-6930 to report what they have witnessed.

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In August 2017, then-Akron police chief James Nice was asked to resign from his post after accusations of racism and inappropriate workplace behavior became public. Now, Nice had his police certificate relinquished after pleading guilty over the unauthorized use of a police database.

Nice joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to read a prepared statement in response to what has been said and written about him over the last six months. In the statement, he believes these allegations against him are “simply not true,” and they have caused him “great economic and emotion harm" over the damage to his reputation.

Due to the litigation, Nice could not divulge much information at this time, but he says he will continue to "seek justice."

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Tuesday, 13 February 2018 07:45

AUDIO: David James on Student, Teacher Safety

Ahead of David James's State of the Schools address on Tuesday at the Tangier, the focus has been on teacher safety and discipline. Several teachers claim the schools are not doing enough as far as disciplinary actions, and they lined up in protest in front of the Akron Board of Education on Monday night.

David James, the superintendent of Akron Public Schools, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show in studio sort out the outcries and give both the teachers union and the board a platform. James is concerned about the safety of the teachers, but also believes these assaults may be a case-by-case situations, as opposed to a widespread problem. He mentioned what is considered assault, which is a wide and varying scope, and that students have the opportunity for due process.

The APS superintendent mentioned the creation of alternative programs for certain students, including those who have special needs such as autism.

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Wednesday, 07 February 2018 09:26

AUDIO: Mayor Judge on Barberton Road Repairs

The city of Barberton continues to tweak and improve their city, and a major part of that is fixing the streets. Through federal grants, Barberton has received over $8 million for road improvements.

Bill Judge, the mayor of Barberton, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to discuss the grant. Judge believes this is “huge news” and “desperately needed” to fix the streets. The streets getting the facelift to start are Norton Avenue, and Wooster Road North and West. Judge is hoping for additional funding down the road for infrastructure.

As for the current roads and conditions during the winter, Judge says the salt supply is still doing well, and they have when they need for city services.

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A sad day for softball fans in the area, as the Akron Racers may be no more, at least in 2018. Joey Arrietta, who ran the Racers from top to bottom, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to sort through the news, which caught her by surprise a few weeks back. Arrietta was ousted as general manager, and now the future of softball remains in doubt. Firestone Stadium will still house high school and collegiate games throughout the summer. An emotional Arrietta says she is fighting to retain the team’s name and the colors, though that is up to the league to decide. As far as the league goes, speculation as to how long it will remain continues to loom.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER

2018 is nearly a month old, and the mayor of Akron, Dan Horrigan, addressed some of the needs and visions in the community on the Ray Horner Morning Show. Topics discussed: *The Akron Racers not playing in 2018, and how that will affect Firestone Stadium and the area of South Akron *What is left of the Rubber Bowl, which looks to cost about $400,000 to demolish *The area surrounding the Rubber Bowl, including Akron-Fulton Airport. *Continued development of the 31 acres that once made up the Innerbelt *Issue 4 and the upgrades to the city’s roads and firehouses *The sewer project

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER
The kid out of Peoria, Illinois is headed to Cooperstown, by way of Philadelphia, Chicago, Los Angeles, Baltimore, and, most notably, Cleveland. Jim Thome, the Indians’ all-time home run leader, is the newest member of the Baseball Hall of Fame, picked on his first try.

Bob DiBiasio, VP of the Tribe, joined the Ray Horner Morning Show to talk about the heart of Thome’s Indians career, which began in 1991, ended in 2002, and had a brief homecoming in 2011. DiBiasio talked about what Thome did off the field, which was where he showcased both his work ethic and his humble personality.

Sheldon Ocker, who covered the Tribe for decades, also came on WAKR to remember Thome. Ocker had the chance to see the lanky infielder grow to become one of his generation’s greatest power hitters. Ocker also shared his thoughts on Omar Vizquel, who had a nice showing in his first time on the ballot.

Published in WAKR RAY HORNER
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